Weighing the Week Ahead: Will Trump Policies Extend the Business Cycle?

We have another holiday-shortened week with little fresh data. While there are some Fed speakers on tap, it is not enough to feed the avaricious punditry. There are two competing themes: the spike in inflation and the continuing assessment of Trump Administration policies. Once again, I expect the two to be joined in most commentaries. Pundits will be asking:

Will Trump policies extend the business cycle?

 

Last Week

Last week the economic news was mostly positive, and stocks responded.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA I predicted a conjunction of two themes as Fed Chair Yellen testified to Congress and President Trump considered candidates for several Fed vacancies. I was only half right. Yellen got plenty of attention from Congressional questioners and revealed that she plans to finish her term as Chair. She also gave some non-specific agreement with some of Trump’s principles about regulation. GOP questioners wanted to talk about the Fed balance sheet. President Trump did not comment about this. This topic will have continuing interest. Presidents are rarely fans of rising interest rates.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short via Jill Mislinski. She notes the record high and the overall gain of 1.51% for the week.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post for several more charts providing long-term perspective.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was mostly positive.

The Good

  • Retail sales increased 0.4% beating expectations of a flat report. December’s data was revised to a 1% gain from the prior 0.6%.
  • NFIB small business optimism shows that “economic growth is coming.” Dr. Ed opines that this must be a Trump effect.

  • Philly Fed survey rose 43.3, crushing expectations of 17.5 and the prior month’s 23.6. The six-month outlook also remains very strong. From the report:

  • Leading indicators remained strong increasing 0.6% and slightly beating expectations.

 

The Bad

  • Industrial production dropped 0.3%, missing expectations for a flat report.
  • Fewer developed market stocks are outperforming – 44% versus the 57% average. Eric Bush of GaveKal explains that this has a negative correlation with the overall market.
  • Kim Jong-un took two provocative actions, two days apart. Jonathan D. Pollack at Brookings wrote “…North Korea’s impetuous young leader, yet again reminded the outside world of his determination to defy international norms by all available means”. The ballistic missile test was a flagrant violation of agreements, and the assassination of his half-brother continues a policy of killing potential rivals. So far, the market has taken little notice of such events or other possible challenges to the new president.
  • Inflation data showed price increases greater than expected (Briefing.com consensus in parentheses). PPI was up 0.6% (0.3%). CPI up 0.6% (0.3%). Core CPI up 0.3% (0.2%).
  • Housing starts declined in January, so I am scoring this as a negative. The prior months were revised higher, and the result was a slight beat of expectations.Calculated Risk, one of the top sources on housing matters, ascribes the shifts to the volatile, multi-family sector. Bill expects starts to increase 3% – 7% in 2017. The range may seem wide, but he is careful to explain the expected error around his forecasts, which have been quite good. See the full post for charts splitting out multi- and single-family.

The Ugly

Malware is winning the race against antivirus software. Users are not taking the most important precautions. Hint: Strong passwords and a password manager. (Slate).

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. This week’s award goes to Josh Brown for his thoughtful analysis of debt, and what it really means. The arguments about excessive debt, the types of debt, and the threats to the system are easily made. It takes only a chart, and most readers are pre-convinced.

Explaining the data requires a deeper, second-order analysis. In his well-sourced aricle, Josh takes a comprehensive look at employment and lending. You need to read the entire post (twice) but the no-nonsense conclusion captures the key point for investors:

When bankers complain, the rhetoric is almost always a caricature of the reality. Today is no different. There’s probably room to streamline or clean up the crisis era regs, but to make the claim that “the banks can’t lend” flies in the face of the actual facts.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a very light week for economic data, with all reports in a three-day period.

The “A” List

  • New home sales (F). Gains expected in this important sector.
  • Michigan sentiment (F). Important indicator for employment and spending.
  • Initial jobless claims (Th). How long can the amazing strength continue?

The “B” List

  • Existing home sales (W). Not as important as new sales, but is a read on the overall strength of the housing market.
  • FOMC minutes (W). No surprises expected.
  • Crude inventories (Th). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

Fed Presidents will be on the speaking trail. Earnings reports continue. Early actions from the Trump Administration have captured the spotlight and will continue to do so.

Next Week’s Theme

 

If the market did not have the extreme Trump focus, the question would be whether incipient inflation suggests the need for more aggressive Fed policy and the probably end of the growth portion of the business cycle.

With the daily parsing of tweets, executive orders, and (somewhat conflicting) policy statements, analysts are scrambling to define and re-define the “Trump Effect.”

In a holiday-shortened, light week for data, I expect a combination of these two themes:

Will Trump Policies Extend the Business Cycle?

Discussion of this topic includes both the policies and the business cycle. Most are not rigorous in separating them.

Scott Grannis does a good job by focusing on the inflation effect and the business cycle. He notes that core CPI inflation has been rather stable, and that it is “a stake through the heart of the deflation demon”.

By contrast, Barron’s focuses on the stock and market effects. In their cover story, they review each Administration move:

Will the week ahead provide any more clarity and focus? Maybe not, but investors should look for the following key points:

  1. Is there evidence of a business cycle peak? Here is Bob Dieli’s take, vividly comparing the disparate opinions:

  1. Will Trump policies extend the cycle? Some are citing confidence from both businesses and consumers as evidence of a return of “animal spirits.” The Trump administration is forecasting much stronger growth than does the CBO. (MarketWatch).
  2. Many Trump moves are generating opposition, sometimes with the Republican party.
  3. Most voters are looking for compromises. This is true of both parties. “The Hill.”

What does this mean for investors? As usual, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in today’s “Final Thought”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

The C-Score has again moved lower, reflecting more inflation via gasoline prices. The level is still not worrisome.

 

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment. (see below).

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies.

Doug Short: The World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator and much more.Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. His interpretation suggests the probability creeping higher, but still after nine months.

The Brooklyn Investor looks at Warren Buffett’s returns, comparing them to other great investors and probability estimates.

Michael Hartnett’s (BofA Merrill Lynch) methods suggest a “melt-up” of 10%. I can’t argue. When CNBC interviewed me about my 2010 call for Dow 20K, I suggested that the next 8-10% would be pretty easy.

How to Use WTWA (especially important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have eight different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

Most of my readers are not clients. While I write as if I were speaking personally to one of them, my objective is to help everyone. I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com for our current report package. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. All our models are now fully invested. The group meets weekly for a discussion they call the “Stock Exchange.” In each post I include a trading theme, ideas from each of our four technical experts, and some rebuttal from a fundamental analyst (usually me). We try to have fun, but there are always fresh ideas. Last week the focus was when and how to “buy the dips” with a current example from Holmes.

Top Trading Advice

 

Dr. Brett is back on the job, with several great posts this week. It is difficult to pick a favorite! He has advice on picking the right instruments to trade, identifying real trader education, and why you need to ask the right questions if you are to learn. Do you, for example track prices right after you are stopped out of a trade? There are several other tough, but valuable questions.

Consider attending his trading workshop at the upcoming NY Trading Expo.

Ralph Vince identifies three factors highly correlated with the price of private property. Traders often forget that guessing when to be short is against the odds.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be Chuck Carnevale’s discussion of MLPs. This is a popular investment for those seeking income. Many just look at the yield. Chuck demonstrates the complexity of these partnerships, explaining valuation, tax considerations, and whether you are simply getting your money back. You should not invest in an MLP without reading this first. In addition to his general warning, he provides several ideas worthy of consideration.

 

Stock Ideas

 

Airline stocks. Warren Buffett? Really? His famous jocular quote was that a capitalist at Kitty Hawk should have shot Orville Wright to save money for his kids. Philip Van Doorn (MarketWatch) presents the story of this changed attitude. Josh Brown explainswhy Mr. B can be flexible while adhering to long-time principles.

Rural broadband? This could be a big beneficiary from an infrastructure plan (Brookings). Also, see my final investing thoughts below.

Our trading model, Holmes, has joined our other models in a weekly market discussion. Each one has a different “personality” and I get to be the human doing fundamental analysis. This week the dip-buying Holmes sold Nielsen (NLSN) on some strength and add General Electric (GE).

 

Seeking yield?

Blue Harbinger notes that Verizon’s yield has moved higher despite a reasonable payout ratio. I agree, but I prefer to write calls against stocks like this. If you stick to short-term calls (with the most rapid time decay) you can generate a cash flow of 9 or 10%, including both dividends and premiums from call sales. If the stock is called away, you find a new candidate, since you have gained 4-5% in six weeks. If the stock declines, you sell a new round of calls. If you merely break even, in the long term, on stocks, you are meeting your income objective. I do not typically mention trades before we do them, but we are looking at a buy/write against the April 50 call, which closed at 77 cents bid. You will collect a 58-cent dividend in early April. If the stock does not move, that is over 2 ½ percent in a few weeks. If it is called away, you make about 4.5% and can look for a new trade. This is a great idea for DIY investors who understand options. Naturally, this is an illustration, not a general recommendation. Do not consider it without consulting your financial advisor (yada yada)!

 

 

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, this is a must-read. Even the more casual long-term investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. The piece about the importance of a will is great. I liked the one helping you teach kids about money. (I tried to do this with poker chips, and you can guess the ending). My favorite was gender control over family finances. Do you think it matters who is earning more? (Hint: Mrs. OldProf regards it as completely irrelevant).

Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich’s strong series is ostensibly aimed at financial advisors – a must-read for them. It also attracts many DIY investors. The topics are always interesting, and the discussion is often spirited. Active versus passive investing is naturally a current hot topic.

Ben Carlson explains how to consider housing expenses as part of your overall financial plan.

In case you missed it, you might enjoy my brief, mid-week post on The Fastest Way to Improve Your Investment Results.

Watch out for…

Overpriced dividend stocks. SD Davis explains the need for looking beyond the hoped-for payments.

Yield plays with “dividends” that are merely a return of your own capital.

Emerging market bonds. Lisa Abramowicz at Bloomberg explains the risks, including a decline in foreign currency reserves.

 

And more on value investing

Black Rock’s Russ Koesterich demonstrates why this style can work in what is perceived as a tough market. Here is his illustrative chart:

Final Thoughts

 

After years of warnings about deflation and impending recessions, the economy is showing some real signs of strength. For whatever reason, much of the punditry clings to the “end of the up-cycle” thesis, in both the economy and in stocks. Neither economic cycles nor bull markets die of old age.

Inflation concerns are premature. The Fed prefers the core PCE measure, which has less emphasis on housing. It runs “cooler” than the CPI. The Fed has also indicated willingness to exceed the 2% inflation target for some time. They can fight inflation more readily than deflation. I do not expect Trump appointments to reverse this consensus.

Most importantly, the punditry calls it a Trump rally since it occurred at about the same time as the election. There is no analysis of reduced uncertainty or improved fundamentals. The main impact seems to be the promise of reduced regulation.

To summarize, there is a significant improvement in confidence, which is great for the economy and corporate earnings. The reasons for more confidence include many sources.

Investing Conclusion

Finding good ideas from major policy changes is an excellent approach — in theory.

In practice, there are many traps. Too often there are incentives for analysts to be first, rather than to be right. While I have suggested caution on this front several times, it is easier for me. I am not required to fill a TV time slot or write a report for brokerage firm clients. If there is no solid conclusion, I am not forced to act. My approach requires good information, including some which is not yet available. The matrix below is a partial representation of my results. There are more sectors, of course, and I have hundreds of tagged articles in a supporting database. I have preliminary entries for most of the cells. The table below is just an illustration of my approach.

Weighing the Week Ahead: Will Q4 Earnings Confirm Recent Economic Strength?

We have a light calendar for economic data and a short week of trading. The biggest news will come from corporate earnings reports. Some financial stocks reported on Friday, but this is the first big week for Q416. Earnings season is always important, but sometimes it is special. This week the pundits will be asking:

Will improving corporate earnings confirm perceptions of a stronger economy?

Last Week

Last week the economic news was strong, but with little reaction from stocks.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA I predicted a punditry focused on the incoming Trump Administration. The confirmation hearings provided a lot of fresh news, and there was not much going on in daily trading. My guess that people would be “digging down” for clues about policy changes was a pretty good one.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. As you can readily see, both the range and the weekly change were very small. You can also see the 1% intra-day move during the Trump press conference.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis grounded in data and several more charts providing long-term perspective.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was quite good—almost all positive. I make objective calls, which means not stretching to achieve a false balance. If I missed something for the “bad” list, please feel free to suggest it in the comments. This is a good week to illustrate the problem with the so-called “economic surprise” indexes. So much depends on how you determine the expectations. If conditions are good, they are good, even though some expect continued improvement each week.

The Good

  • Mortgage applications up 5.8%, despite concerns that higher rates would hurt the market. This is a very nice surprise.
  • Jobless claims at 247K continues at an extremely low level.
  • Michigan sentiment at 98.1 on the preliminary survey remains very strong (although a slight miss on expectations).
  • Sea container counts end the year on a strong note. Steven Hansen (GEI) does his expected deep dive into the data, providing plenty of long-term analysis. Here is a key table:

  • NFIB small business outlook surges. Scott Grannis has the story, including references to consumer confidence as well.

 

The Bad

  • Retail sales? More spin – good or bad?

U.S. retail sales disappoint at end of the year (MarketWatch) at 9:10 ET.

Holiday retail sales rise 4% to beat NRF expectations (MarketWatch) at 10:29 ET.

 

  • Gasoline prices are up about 20% year-over-year. New Deal Democrat has the story.
  • Business inventories? Some regard this as bad because of the m/o/m increase of 0.7%. Last week I called this a very spinnable number. Inventories are either wanted or unwanted. Going into the number we knew that the level was depleted. This is really a neutral report.

The Ugly

Volkswagen Diesel Scandal. We now know that this was the responsibility of important executives – not just low-level employees or a faceless corporation. Fiat Chrysler is also charged, but claims important differences.

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. There is week’s award goes to David Moenning (a nomination from a reader, Lasrman) for his helpful discussion of “Alts.” He writes as follows:

The pitch is strong. “Alts,” as they are called, are touted as a source of diversification, a way to create non-correlated portfolios, and a means toward potential risk reduction during severe market declines. I’ve heard some folks even suggest that alts are a way to produce a solid “riskless” returns!

And….

…who doesn’t want to own an investing strategy that is designed to produce a nice, steady 6-8% return without the vagaries associated with the traditional asset classes?

And the problem….

Investopedia goes on to note that most of these alt strategies are designed for sophisticated investors. “Most alternative investment assets are held by institutional investors or accredited, high-net-worth individuals because of the complex natures and limited regulations of the investments,” the website says.

[Jeff] The most attractive track record I ever saw was from Bernie Madoff – consistent strong returns and minimal drawdowns. It was too good to be true. David’s experience is quite like mine. I get pitches for these products on a regular basis. Some of them are theoretically sound and might work. The average investor does not have the skill to evaluate them.

We also published our annual review of winners. If you take a look at the excellent work reviewed (here and here) you will see the advantage of following these contrarian sources. You will be surprised at how much it can help your investing!
The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

It is back to normal for the volume of economic data, but fewer of the most important reports.

The “A” List

  • Housing starts and building permits (Th). The most important leading data in a key sector.
  • Industrial production (W). The expected rebound would improve overall confidence in the economy.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Beige Book (W). The Fed’s district-by-district look will be scoured for signs that rate hikes might come more quickly than expected.
  • Philly Fed (Th). Earliest read on the new month has gained more respect in the past year.
  • CPI (Th). Interest in the inflation reports is building, but the worrisome stages are not imminent.
  • Crude inventories (Th). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

Fed speakers are still on the trail, with appearances every day. Chair Yellen will make two appearances.

Earnings reports will be the most important news.

Next Week’s Theme

 

It is a short week, with a light calendar of data. The Trump story continues as confirmation hearings shed a little more light on possible policies. There will be plenty of FedSpeak.

Despite these factors, the start of earnings season should give the punditry a break from All Trump, all the time. Because of recent economic strength, people will be skeptically searching the earnings news for signs of weakness or a negative outlook. The key question will be:

Do Earnings Reports Confirm a Stronger Economy?

The basic positions are simple.

  • Reports normally beat estimates, and there is plenty of potential this season (FactSet)

  • Some recent laggards are looking strong—energy, tech, financials (Brian Gilmartin).
  • Corbin Perception suggests that expectations are very high. This is an interesting collection of survey data. Read the full report, but here is a nice summary:
    • Heading into 4Q16 earnings season, 85% of surveyed investors expect results to be in line or better than consensus, an increase from 78% last quarter
    • Expectations for improving organic growth surpasses worsening for the first time in more than a year
    • Investor sentiment towards the U.S. has improved dramatically; 70% now forecast higher U.S. GDP while recession fears have pushed out
    • Rate hikes drive sector views: participants most bullish on Financials while Utilities and REITs see dramatic pullback in sentiment
    • 67% of investors report feeling better about the U.S economy post-election; recession fears off the table for 2017
  • Earnings are inflated by peak profit margins and bogus analyst forecasts. “Organic” growth is low and so is revenue growth. (I see these comments, but we would all appreciate some credible sources).

 

What does this mean for investors? As usual, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in today’s “Final Thoughts”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

Although dropping last week, the yield on the ten-year note has increased significantly since the election. This has lowered the risk premium a bit. I suspect much more to come. By this I mean that the relative attractiveness of stocks and bonds will continue to narrow.

The C-Score has also dropped. The relationship is not linear, and it remains in the “safe” zone.

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed. His most recent research update suggests some “mixed signals” from labor markets.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator and much more.Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. Georg thinks it is still a year away. It is interesting to watch this approach along with our weekly monitoring of the C-Score.

Doug Short: The World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

Davidson (via Todd Sullivan) notes that Markets Do Not Peak Until Spread Shifts To Zero

The indicators in this fine post are consistent with what we see from our regular sources. Many of these subsume the concept mentioned.

 

 

How to Use WTWA (especially important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have eight different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

Most of my readers are not clients. While I write as if I were speaking personally to one of them, my objective is to help everyone. I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com for our current report package. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. Felix is fully invested. Oscar is fully invested, but the sectors are less aggressive. The more cautious Holmes has taken some profits, but is still about 90% invested. The group meets weekly for a discussion they call the “Stock Exchange.” In each post I include a trading theme, ideas from each of our four technical experts, and some rebuttal from a fundamental analyst (usually me). There are fresh ideas each week. You can also ask questions and have a little fun.

Top Trading Advice

 

Sir Michael Hintze suggests that “Trump volatility” is good for active managers. This is also true for investors and traders. Check out Eddy Elfenbein’s account of the Trump press conference effects on healthcare.

Adam H. Grimes has advice aimed at new traders, but everyone can benefit. a useful and timely post for traders turning the page on the calendar. While the focus is on motivation, he has several specific suggestions. He analyzes each of the following important points:

Decide if you want to trade or gamble.

Have an open mind, but a critical mind.

Understand what “proof” looks like.

If you want to trade, bet size is really important.

Psychology matters, but these things are more important.

Dr. Brett Steenbarger illustrates how to make Internet discussions work well. He links to the Grimes post and extends some of the arguments. An intelligent discussion of important factors is one of the most important sources for traders (and investors). He has almost daily posts. Any serious trader should read them all. Another great example from this week shows how to turn failure into strength.

Those who join us in reading Brett Steenbarger’s regular posts will enjoy his appearance on Barry Ritholtz’s acclaimed MiB series.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be Morgan Housel’s account of his dinner with Daniel Kahneman. It is a nice summary of Kahneman’s basic ideas – all worth reading. Morgan has a great sense for what is important and what you need to know about it. Here is my favorite quote:

On education changing thinking: “There are studies showing that when you present evidence to people they get very polarized even if they are highly educated. They find ways to interpret the evidence in conflicting ways. Our mind is constructed so that in many situations where we have beliefs and we have facts, the beliefs come first. That’s what makes people incapable of being convinced by evidence. So education by itself is not going to change the culture. Changing critical thinking through education is very slow and I’m not very optimistic about it.”

 

Stock Ideas

 

Do you believe that managers with a ten-year success record might have good ideas? If so, look at these picks. (We own several of them, which encourages me to put the rest on our watch list).

Many stocks are attractive, despite the popular valuation perception. Rupert Hargreaves reports the Jefferies take. Hint: Cyclicals and value look good.

Our trading model, Holmes, has joined our other models in a weekly market discussion. Each one has a different “personality” and I get to be the human doing fundamental analysis. We have an enjoyable discussion every week, including four or five specific ideas that we are buying. This week the dip-buying Holmes (who has been very hot) likes Michael Kors (KORS). Check out the post for my own reaction, and more information about the trading models.

Seeking yield?

How about Raytheon? William Stamm describes the dividend hike and the potential.

Kohl’s 5% looks safe. (Josh Arnold). This is one where we enhance yield by selling near-term calls.

But watch out for companies where the dividend might not be safe. Can you depend on 5.7% from Blackstone? (Brian Bollinger)

And a key question: Should dividend investors be worried about rising interest rates? Rebecca Corvino provides some great links.

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, this is a must-read. Even the more casual long-term investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. My personal favorite this week is Megan McArdle’s post on the importance of saving. Investors should understand that the 401(k) is not a substitute for the old guaranteed benefits plans.

I have often commented that when Tadas has the time to write a standalone post, it is a special treat. This week he wrote about the “evidence-based” movement, the endurance of outmoded ideas, and what it all might mean for investors. A general conclusion is that many investors should minimize fees, choosing cheap robo-advisors or doing some basic rebalancing on their own.

Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich’s Financial Advisors’ Daily Digest has quickly become a must-read for financial professionals. Somewhat to my surprise, the topics also stimulate comments from active individual investors. It has added to the value of the posts for both groups. Gil engages the same topic as Tadas – the need for financial advisors. (and also here).

This is a topic that hits close to home. I am quite sure that an intelligent investor who never made the common mistakes could avoid the fees of a professional advisor. I even provide a way for investors to check this out. Just ask for our free report, The Top Twelve Investor Pitfalls – and How to Avoid Them. If you regularly navigate these problems, you can fly solo! If not, you might be losing 4-8% each year. Less than 1% of my regular audience consists of clients. I started writing to help average investors, and that remains my principal motivation. I am disappointed to see what seems like an increasingly commercial approach by so many of my friends. I know that they all seek to provide excellent and special service.

 

Final Thoughts

 

As the Q2 and Q3 earnings seasons began, I wrote about the possible end of the “earnings recession” and an inflection point in forward earnings. Those events have come to pass, but we now have a new concern: the outlook. Conference calls and the company’s guidance is always interesting, but this quarter is special. Companies cannot know what the policy changes will be, nor can they predict the effects on their business.

In each week’s “Final Thoughts” I offer opinions based upon facts. Sometimes my conclusion is a description of what I find important to watch. So it is this week. My scorecard for earnings season will look for the following company characteristics:

  • Confidence. I expect most to have a murky outlook, with no reason to set the future bar very high.
  • Important trade relationships – imports or exports. Comments on these fears may create some buying opportunities.
  • Concern about a stronger dollar. Everyone is teed up to watch for this, and we should as well.

Earnings reports help us interpret the strength of the economy using non-government data. In this earnings season, it is especially important to know the story as well as the numbers.

 

Weighing the Week Ahead: New Year, New Highs, and a New List of Worries

There is a normal dose of economic data this week, but we are entering a quiet, pre-holiday period. As the rally faltered a bit, the Dow 20K talk yielded to a discussion of what could go wrong. I expect this discussion to continue in the coming week, and perhaps the next one as well. The punditry will be asking:

What can derail the rally?

Last Week

In a reversal from the last month, most of the economic news was soft. There was little apparent market effect.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted a week-long fixation on the Dow 20K story. That was very accurate, with the closest call coming just as I arrived at Chicago’s NBC tower for a CNBC interview on my 2010 forecast. I think it represents a delay rather than a jinx. Some might attribute the selling to the Fed and Chair Yellen’s press conference, an “effect” that was reversed the next day. It must have been meJ I’ll stay at the office for the rest of the year!

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. He captures the continuing rally and the move to new highs.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis grounded in data and several more charts providing long-term perspective.

Personal

I will have several year-end posts planned for the next two weeks, but will probably skip WTWA next weekend. I am planning a Weighing the Year Ahead installment, probably in two weeks.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was quite good—almost all positive. I make objective calls, which means not stretching to achieve a false balance. If I missed something for the “bad” list, please feel free to suggest it in the comments.

The Good

  • Framing lumber prices are higher, year-over-year. Calculated Risk sees this as an important leading indicator for housing, so we should, too.
  • Initial jobless claims edged lower, to 254K.
  • Hotels are close to an occupancy record. (Calculated Risk).
  • The Fed provided the expected increase in rates with almost no market reaction. (That is the good part). Tim Duy provides some insight. See also “Davidson” via Todd Sullivan.
  • The Philly Fed showed a big gain to 21.5 (7.6 prior) and trouncing expectations. I am not very interested in the Empire State survey, but it mirrored the Philly result. Business and consumer confidence have both strengthened since the election. Confidence is essential for spending, investment, and economic strength.
  • Inflation is still tame, even as it creeps toward the Fed’s target.
  • Household balance sheets are much stronger. Scott Grannis regularly produces this chart. It is far more valuable than material from those focusing exclusively on debt, and ignoring assets.

  • Homebuilder confidence hits the highest level since 2005. (Calculated Risk).

 

The Bad

  • Industrial production declined by 0.4% from October to November.
  • The rail contraction continues. Steven Hansen continues his coverage with multiple takes and time frames. Check it out!
  • China/drone incident. The drone seizure coincided with Friday selling, a hint of market reaction to sensitive international issues. China will return the drone and claims that the story was “hyped up.”
  • High frequency indicators edge lower. NDD’s useful weekly compilation shows continuing strength in short leading indicators, neutral in the coincident group, and some weakness in the long term. He is downplaying the effects due to seasonality, but it bears watching.
  • Housing starts dropped by 18.7%. This was a very bad headline number. Various sources suggest that it emphasizes multi-family while single-family is strong. This is a shift that is quite acceptable, so we should follow it closely. Calculated Risk, our go-to source on all things housing, has a great analysis and this chart.

The Ugly

The Young. Colleges are profiting from helping credit card companies. The choices are frequently worse than the student could find otherwise.

The Old. Brett Arends opines that cost-of-living adjustments may soon end. Already the inflation rate for seniors, mostly because of medical costs, exceeds the standard CPI calculation.

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. No award this week, but opportunities abound and nominations are welcome!
The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a normal week for data, loaded into the latter part of the week. Things will get very quiet after Friday’s opening.

The “A” List

  • Michigan sentiment (F). Confidence is important right now. Will the mid-month preliminary high hold up?
  • New home sales (F). Not much change expected in this important sector.
  • Leading indicators (Th). This widely followed measure is likely to be flat.
  • Personal income and spending (Th). This important read on the economy is expected to show solid growth.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Existing home sales (W). A small decline is expected. Less important than new construction, but still relevant.
  • PCE price index (Th). The Fed’s favorite inflation indicator – still very tame at a touch over 1%.
  • Q3 GDP third estimate (Th). Little change expected in what is now viewed as “old news.”
  • Durable goods orders (Th). This volatile series is expected to be much weaker than the October data.
  • Crude inventories (W). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

Despite the end of the FOMC quiet period, we have little FedSpeak. Chair Yellen makes an early-week appearance, and that is all I see.

Next Week’s Theme

 

Last week attention focused on Dow 20K. This was true even though it is a rather meaningless round number in a flawed index. It shows the power of symbolism to attract attention. When the rally fizzled out, the story swiftly turned. Everyone questions rapid, short-term moves, so it is a natural for the punditry.

I expect it to carry over into a quiet week, with plenty of focus on 2017. The popular question will be about what could stop the rally. What should we worry about? It is time to rebuild the wall or worry.

What could go wrong?

Pundits were already hard at work last week:

You should ignore the lists or 2017 winners.

Trump’s policies might not get enacted, disappointing markets. S&P businesses are in line for $87.1 billion.

Trump’s policies might be enacted, hurting the economy and markets. (Think trade matters).

Trump might make a bad decision in a crisis. An ill-timed tweet?

Valuations are still excessive. Stocks are too pricey to buy.

The Fed and a strong dollar might hurt earnings.

Stocks might get too expensive for dividend reinvestment. (You can’t make this up).

Bonds are sending a warning.

Or maybe we should look at the bright side?

A nice reversal from the negativity of last January, the worst start to a year ever. (Josh Brown).

The rally is real. Brian Wesbury’s valuation model showed stocks as 30% under-valued on election day.

20% upside for next year? Brian Gilmartin sticks to the facts. This is an earnings-based conclusion.

 

What should investors conclude from these sharply conflicting ideas? As usual, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in today’s “Final Thoughts”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

The increased yield on the ten-year note has lowered the risk premium a bit. I suspect much more to come. By this I mean that the relative attractiveness of stocks and bonds will continue to narrow.

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed. His most recent research update suggests some “mixed signals” from labor markets.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. Georg thinks it is still a year away. It is interesting to watch this approach along with our weekly monitoring of the C-Score.

Doug Short: The World Markets Weekend Update (and much more). Jill Mislinski updates the ECRI coverage, noting that their public leading index is at the highest point since 2010. Surprisingly, the ECRI public statements remain bearish on the U.S. economy, the global economy, and stocks. It is as if they never recovered from the bad recession call in 2011. They have been out of step ever since.

James Picerno highlights an important, oft-ignored relationship. Many worry about higher interest rates. He notes the relationship between higher rates and stronger economic growth.

 

How to Use WTWA (especially important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio, and less risk.
  • Holmes and friends – the top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why it is a great time to own for Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (I welcome questions on this subject. What scares you now?)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. Felix is fully invested. Oscar is fully invested in aggressive sectors. The more cautious Holmes also remains fully invested, but with continued profit-taking and position switching. The group meets weekly for a discussion they call the “Stock Exchange.” This week we had a great topic – whether the focus on Dow20K had an effect on technical analysis. The prior two segments were on limiting risk and maximizing returns. (We report exits from announced Holmes positions if you ask to be on that list. Write to holmes at newarc dot com).

Top Trading Advice

 

Brett Steenbarger continues to provide almost daily insights for traders. Sometimes the ideas draw upon his expertise in psychology. Sometimes they emphasize his skills in training traders. Sometimes there are specific trading themes. They all deserve reading. This week I especially liked the following:

Adam H. Grimes has an excellent piece on finding ideas. You must be experienced, but also avoid confirmation bias. Dr. Brett gives a HT and follows up.

Brendan Mullooly takes one of my favorite approaches – drawing a lesson from outside trading, especially from sports. This approach helps rid us of confirmation bias, providing a fresh look. Check out the full post for data on the impact from overtrading. And the sports analogy? Teams that keep switching quarterbacks!

[This chart was approved by Mrs. OldProf, a native of Green Bay and a knowledgeable football fan.]

 

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be advice from legendary investor Peter Lynch. Instead of finding something from the last week, I wanted to find the best choice for current conditions. Ben Carlson did the Peter Lynch report about two years ago, starting with this very relevant quotation:

Far more money has been lost by investors preparing for corrections, or trying to anticipate corrections, than has been lost in corrections themselves.

And also….

Now no one seems to know when they are gonna happen. At least if they know about ’em, they’re not telling anybody about ’em. I don’t remember anybody predicting the market right more than once, and they predict a lot. So they’re gonna happen. If you’re in the market, you have to know there’s going to be declines. And they’re going to cap and every couple of years you’re going to get a 10 percent correction. That’s a euphemism for losing a lot of money rapidly. That’s what a “correction” is called. And a bear market is 20-25-30 percent decline.

They’re gonna happen. When they’re gonna start, no one knows. If you’re not ready for that, you shouldn’t be in the stock market. I mean the stomach is the key organ here. It’s not the brain. Do you have the stomach for these kinds of declines? And what’s your timing like? Is your horizon one year? Is your horizon ten years or 20 years?

What the market’s going to do in one or two years, you don’t know. Time is on your side in the stock market.

 

Stock Ideas

Lee Jackson has an interesting screen that produced 5 Dividend Stocks that You Can Still Buy With Market at Record Highs. “We screened the Merrill Lynch research data base for stocks that are rated Buy, pay a dividend and haven’t gone parabolic this year. We found five that make good sense for investors”.

Wind energy stocks have been left behind in the “Trump rally.” Buying opportunity or victim of policy changes?

But keep in mind that solar is now cheaper than wind energy. Tom Randall (Bloomberg Technology) has a helpful analysis of how much and why.

Our trading model, Holmes, has joined our other models in a weekly market discussion. Each one has a different “personality” and I get to be the human doing fundamental analysis. We have an enjoyable discussion every week, including four or five specific ideas that we are buying. This week Holmes likes Amgen (AMGN). Check out the post for my own reaction, and more information about the trading models.

While we cannot verify the suitability of specific stocks for everyone who is a reader, the ideas have worked well so far. My hope is that it will be a good starting point for your own research. Holmes may exit a position at any time. If you want more information about the exits, just sign up via holmes at newarc dot com. You will get an email update whenever we sell an announced position.

Some Merrill Lynch top picks for 2017 (via 24/7 Wall Street).

Ben Levisohn (Barron’s) sees 23% upside for FedEx.

Interested in REITs? Try health care.

Get ready for Eddy Elfenbein’s new buy list. This annual event is a great source of ideas for investors who like to think in a time frame of at least a year. You can also join in the whole list via Eddy’s new ETF (CWS). It is both convenient and inexpensive.

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, you should join us in adding this to your daily reading. Every investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are always several great choices worth reading. My personal favorite this week is the important article by Jonathan Clements on your personal risk-free rate. It is not the T-Bill or T-Note from financial analysis, but your own most costly loan. This may seem obvious, but many people fail to consider it in their financial calculations.

Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich’s Financial Advisors’ Daily Digest is a must-read for financial professionals. The topics are frequently important for active individual investors, so the series is worth following regularly. This week I especially liked the discussion of financial literacy. Even active investors are unable to answer basic questions. WTWA readers would get them all right, so it may seem very surprising.

Watch out for…

Bonds cratering while stocks rally. Eddy Elfenbein presents a telling chart.

Final Thoughts

 

My biggest reason for the 2010 Dow20K post was to alert investors to the idea of “upside risk.” There is always – always – a list of plausible worries. These dominate the news and the financial discussions. The other side is difficult. It is boring to say repeatedly that things are normal and promising. Talking about some new development seems smart – attracting viewers, page views, more gigs to make you famous, and even investors who seek confirmation.

The natural process leads to a focus on problems. These are easy to see, while solutions are not. Therefore, most investors do not understand the ill-named concept of the wall of worry.

The new list of worries, all well-known and reflected in current market prices, is a replacement for those listed on my current “investor fears” page, which replaced those from the 2010 era. It seems smart to study world events and use that knowledge to guide your investment decisions. But it is not!

You cannot make these calls as well as the market does. You are almost certain to over-react.

The investor mistakes I highlighted in 2010 are still with us:

  1. Excessive attention to headline events;
  2. Reliance on poor forecasts of the economy, especially recessions; (James Picerno has a great list of typical forecasts)
  3. Too much reliance on backward-looking earnings, reflective of unusual events and times.
  4. Ignoring the long-term economic forces putting idle assets to work. (Mark Hulbert on 24K)
  5. Emphasizing politics instead of investing. In 2008 many investors hated the prospects and principles of the Obama administration. They sat out the start, and never found an entry point.

It is more profitable to accept a measure of uncertainty, rely upon the best recession and earnings indicators, and remain agnostic about politics.

 

This is a good time to ask yourself about how have you done? If you are wondering whether you might do better with a financial advisor, check out my latest paper, The Top Twelve Investor Pitfalls – and How to Avoid Them. If you regularly navigate these problems, you can fly solo! That is true for 99% of my readers, whom I am trying to help. Some readers might well benefit from our help. Readers of WTWA can get a free copy by sending an email to info at newarc dot com. We will not share your address with anyone.

Weighing the Week Ahead: Time for a Portfolio “Transition?”

There is some important data on the schedule for this week, along with earnings and the expected doses of FedSpeak. None of that will attract much attention. Instead expect “all Trump, all the time”. The slant in financial media will be the implications for investors. As we get news of the leadership transition, I expect the punditry to be asking:

Do investment portfolios need a transition?

Last Week

Last week’s economic news was all good, but less important than the election.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted a focus on the election and the chances for greater economic and financial clarity. The election expectation was obvious, and there was indeed a focus on the implications for investors. That said, I embraced the consensus expectations which proved to be dramatically incorrect. I did correctly note that the crystal ball would remain cloudy, but that proved to be quite an understatement.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. He captures the post-election rally as well as the Friday fizzling.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis grounded in data and several more charts providing long-term perspective. Here is one additional example.

The big story of the trading week does not show up in the stock market data. As the Trump victory became apparent, overnight trading in stock futures showed a massive decline. This chart shows the selling and the morning rebound.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was quite good. If I missed something for the “bad” list, please feel free to suggest it in the comments.

The Good

  • Election uncertainty ended. This was a known, market-friendly event, although the amount of the reaction was a surprise.
  • Framing lumber demand drives higher prices. Those who prefer market data to other source should take note of the data from Calculated Risk.
  • Earnings reports continue strength on all measures. Earnings growth, results versus expectations, sales versus expectations, and outlook are all solid (FactSet). It is not getting much attention, but the “earnings recession” is over. Brian Gilmartin provided the first alert on this dramatic shift, and now points to a possible expansion in multiples. Ed Yardeni shows the impact via changed expectations.

  • Michigan sentiment showed strength with a reading of 91.6, solidly beating the prior month and expectations. The survey was before the election.
  • JOLTS remained positive. This may be the most misunderstood indicator. Pundits use it to analyze job growth, because that is what they want to know about. Many other measures do that job better. JOLTS is about the structure of the labor market. How tight things are and whether employees freely leave jobs for others. If you do not understand the Beveridge Curve, you do not understand JOLTS.

  • Initial jobless claims declined to 254K, marking 88 consecutive weeks below 300K. This is the best record since 1970. Calculated Risk has the story and a helpful chart.

The Bad

  • OPEC output jumped. This calls into question the planned production cuts. Whether you agree with me that stock prices should not be linked to oil prices, that continues to be the reality. Thus – this news is market unfriendly. (MarketWatch)

 

The Ugly

Financial abuse of the elderly. Reshma Kapadia of Barron’s has a great feature article on this topic, describing the various scams and consequences. Here are a few of the top ones:

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. No award this week. Nominations are welcome.
Noteworthy

Could you pass the U.S. Citizenship Test? You might enjoy the quiz from BuzzFeed. Example: Who was not one of the writers of the Federalist papers? John Jay, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, or Thomas Jefferson? Mrs. OldProf tells me that this one is too easy if you scored a ticket to Hamilton and paid attention.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have an important week for economic data, with a special focus on housing.

The “A” List

  • Housing starts and building permits (Th). Different directions in recent reports.
  • Retail sales (T). Continuing strength expected.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Philly Fed (Th). Continuing small gains expected in an early read on November.
  • Industrial production (W). Small growth expected despite recent weakness.
  • PPI (W). Still not a major market factor, but moving higher.
  • CPI (Th). Not the Fed’s “official” inflation indicator, but it is moving beyond the target.
  • Business inventories (T). September data, but relevant for final Q3 GDP.
  • Crude inventories (W). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

There are still some earnings reports, including housing stocks. Once again we also have almost daily Fedspeak. We’ll get to watch some dancing around the political questions.

Next Week’s Theme

 

In a different year, this would be a week for special attention to housing. The economic data feature some important forward-looking indicators and earnings reports include important housing-related stocks. Instead, the surprised investment community is scrambling to identify the implications of a Trump presidency and a GOP Congress. Regular media will have daily reports of transition plans, cabinet appointments, and shifting policy stances. Financial media will focus on what it means for investors. Expect this question to be a common theme:

Does your portfolio need a complete remake?

Here are the important issues:

  • Has the best asset allocation shifted? More stocks, less bonds?
  • Is the overall market more dangerous? Time for more cash?
  • What are the likely economic consequences, in both the short and long terms? The WSJ has a nice general summary, loaded with charts, about the economy Mr. Trump will inherit.
  • Which stock sectors are likely to benefit, and by how much?
  • Are there specific stock favorites?

Traders rushed to act, frequently on hastily and ill-formed ideas. The overnight futures trading is a spectacular example, but most of the other conclusions are also quite speculative. Consider how wrong many of the big names in investments have been. Citi, Goldman and Bridgewater Associates all expected declines of 3 – 10% on a Trump victory. Even after the market was rallying, many of the pros were expecting the story to end at any moment. As Time notes, the three errors included the event itself, the impact, and the aftermath.

I advised caution in a message to my readers “the morning after.” (Clients got more detail). Check out the post for my list of four key points.

As one person noted in the comments, using patience left you behind on some day-trading possibilities. True enough, if you guessed well. Would stocks down 6% continue to decline or stocks up 6% keep ascending.

I’ll have a few ideas of my own about what comes next in today’s “Final Thoughts”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

The increased yield on the ten-year note has lowered the risk premium a bit. I suspect much more to come.

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies.

Doug Short: The Big Four Update, the World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator, and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. Georg thinks it is still a year away. It is interesting to watch this approach along with our weekly monitoring of the C-Score.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed.

 

How to Use WTWA (important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio, and less risk.
  • Holmes and friends – the top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why it is a great time to own for Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (I welcome questions on this subject. What scares you?)

Thanks also to readers for the interest and early comments for my latest paper, The Top Twelve Investor Pitfalls – and How to Avoid Them. Readers of WTWA can get a copy by sending an email to info at newarc dot com. We will not share your address with anyone.

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. Felix is fully invested. Oscar holds several aggressive sectors. The more cautious Holmes also remains fully invested. Now joined by Athena, the group has a regular Thursday night discussion which they call the “Stock Exchange.” This week’s question was the effectiveness of technical analysis in the aftermath of a disruptive event. You can see that discussion as well as the most recent ideas for consideration – and you can ask questions!

Top Trading Advice

 

Brett Steenbarger warns against overtrading simply because things are boring. Not so much this week, but that might make it the best time to consider a great lesson.

He also presents an update on his market trading models, an interesting comparison to our approaches.

Bill Luby shows that the volatility crush was among the top 25 in history. If you have been trading VIX as a long, plenty of agility was necessary to limit your losses. If it was a hedge, you needed significant positions in the right sectors to make a profit. Check out VIX and More for the full story.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be the cool-headed and accurate analysis from Liz Ann Sonders: Don’t Fear a Recession or Market Overvaluation. This coverage of Schwab’s IMPACT 2016, the largest conference in the investor business. Robert Huebscher continually brings the best analysis to advisors through special posts. I always read them along with many other advisors, but they are not a secret. You too can see what the advisor community is following. Here is a key quote on valuation:

“Valuation metrics can support any view of the market,” she said. The metrics that are dependent on an inflation or interest-rate component show that the market is cheap, she said. But metrics such as the forward P/E ratio show a median valuation. Sonders said that valuations tend to be highest when inflation is 2-3%, just above its current range. “But inflation going higher is a risk for P/E ratios,” she explained.

A slavish devotion to valuation indicators that ignore low interest rates has been an expensive mistake for investors. Here is a chart of the ETF modeled on Prof Shiller’s famous CAPE ratio. Despite the professor’s repeated statements that he is personally invested and recommends a significant stock allocation, his work is most frequently cited as indicating potential for a market crash. That is not his personal interpretation. The Barclay’s ETF uses CAPE to find the most attractive sectors, and it remains fully invested.

Suppose that each of the CAPE devotees who went to cash because of alarming valuations had allocated just 25% of the portfolio to the CAPE fund. (Not that this has been the very best choice, but it illustrates the Shiller contrast very well.)

 

Stock Ideas

 

Companies that may participate in “rebuilding the aging infrastructure.” Here are eleven stocks (24/7 Wall St) that could benefit from the $2.75 trillion that The American Society of Civil Engineers sees as necessary. Some of the ideas might surprise you.

Barron’s has a summary of other stock ideas, for those interested in immediate pursuit of the Trump theme.

 

Our trading model, Holmes, has joined our other models in a weekly market discussion. Each one has a different “personality” and I get to be the human doing fundamental analysis. We have an enjoyable discussion every week, with four or five specific ideas that we are also buying. This week Holmes likes Tractor Supply (TSCO). Check out the post for my own reaction, and more information about the trading models.

While we cannot verify the suitability of specific stocks for everyone who is a reader, the ideas have worked well so far. My hope is that it will be a good starting point for your own research. Holmes may exit a position at any time. If you want more information about the exits, just sign up via holmes at newarc dot com. You will get an email update whenever we sell an announced position.

Marc Gerstein plays the “semi-contrarian” with his EBAY idea.

Chuck Carnevale has a very important post combining an analysis of the risk from increased market volatility, with the analysis of specific stocks. Investors should be reading Chuck’s work carefully every week.

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, you should join us in adding this to your daily reading. Every investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are always several great choices worth reading. My personal favorite this week is the advice on how to handle market volatility from Christine Benz (Morningstar). She easily clears the first hurdle – the temptation to give blanket advice. Each investor is different. She offers time frame as one important consideration. If investors want to copy what I do with clients, this article provides a good basic outline.

As you gauge whether to make any changes in light of the volatility, the really important concept to keep on your radar is risk capacity–what sort of losses can you endure without having to rework a goal?

If you still have a reasonably long time until retirement–say, 10 years or more—you have a fairly high risk capacity. That means that regardless of how you feel about near-term losses, you’re likely to recover from them during your time horizon. In fact, stocks have generated positive returns in more than 90% of rolling 10-year periods. For that reason, such investors ought to have aggressively positioned portfolios with at least 50% in stocks; given today’s low bond and cash yields, a more conservatively positioned portfolio will barely preserve purchasing power, let alone grow.

Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich was one of the few to highlight the possibility of a Trump victory, and do so with confidence. He reasoned from the Brexit precedent and a sense of the popular uprising. In a helpful and constructive fashion, he disagreed with my highlighted sources in last week’s WTWA. While his work is popular among investment advisors writing on Seeking Alpha, the topics are frequently important for active individual investors.

Out of the several helpful posts last week, my favorite was the individual investor advice (and appreciated the mention) to follow your plan rather than the election. This is especially persuasive from someone who called the election result. The money line from Gil?

But as we all know, investing is best accomplished unemotionally.

Other ideas?

For the most conservative investors, who normally stick to Treasuries, it may be time to switch to TIPS. Barron’s explains that inflation fears have now given the edge to the inflation-protected securities.

Emergency fund idea bad advice? Sally Krawcheck explains why paying off credit cards is more important. Do the math!

Blue Harbinger provides an update on Business Development Companies (BDCs). The article ranks many of the opportunities, and provides criteria for evaluation. This is a good start for anyone considering investments in this space.

Watch out for…

Dividend stocks? Many observers opined that this week’s decline in the bond substitutes was only the start. (I agree). The dividend investment gurus have a different take. While they are looking for buying opportunities, here are the early returns.

Final Thoughts

 

Last week I embraced the conclusions from the polling community, which was dramatically incorrect. They are preparing post-mortems. They will try to figure out the sources of error and improve their methods, because that is what professionals do. Of the sources I cited last week, Nate Silver was the best. Even his methods gave Mr. Trump only about a 30% chance. That is not high enough to predict the outcome, but it should get one’s attention. I will be doing my own review of what went wrong with the pollsters, and whether we gave them too much credit.

I was more accurate concerning what investors should be doing about the election. I have expected a market rally after the election, if only because a big element of uncertainty would be removed. I also have warned that plenty of uncertainty will remain!

If you allowed your political preferences to influence your investing, you probably have had poor results. If you have been sticking to the fundamentals – a solid portfolio of cheap stocks – you are doing well.

What’s Next?

As I write this we have already seen a change in the Trump transition leadership and acceptance of some elements of ObamaCare. Each policy needs fresh scrutiny, using the following elements:

  • The possible difference between candidate Trump and President Trump
    • Which proposals were serious
    • The effect of actual responsibility
    • The influence of the team
  • The limitations of power (See this great take on what Truman said about Eisenhower)
  • The potential for compromises

I will look at these questions on a policy-by-policy basis, discovering the changes in value in the related stocks. Many journalists and pundits are on this job, of course, but the instant conclusions are unreliable. Even the best journalists and financial analysts have little experience in analyzing the workings of the policymaking process.

For most investors, a portfolio review is in order, and a remake might be. As the leadership transitions, so should your asset allocation and stock selection. It is a job that should be done carefully, and done right. You have a lot at stake.

Weighing the Week Ahead: When Will the Trading Range Be Broken?

We have normal week for economic data, including the first estimate for Q3 GDP. There are also important earnings reports. Election stories have become even more intense. Meanwhile, the market has been pretty quiet. I expect financial media to be asking:

When will the trading range be broken?

Personal Notes

I will be traveling next week and probably will not write WTWA.

I have completed my new paper, The Top Twelve Investor Pitfalls – and How to Avoid Them. Readers of WTWA can get a copy by sending an email to info at newarc dot com. We will not share your email address with anyone.

Last Week

Last week’s news was pretty good, despite the modest reaction in stocks.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted more attention to the “stealth market rotation.” This idea got a little attention on Monday from the Pundit-in-Chief, but that was all. The rotation was less pronounced and the competing stories were good ones.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. Stocks had a slightly positive week, but the real story is the continuation of a very narrow trading range.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all of the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis grounded in data and several more charts providing long-term perspective.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something really good. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

The Good

  • Building permits rose and beat expectations. But housing starts declined (see below). New Deal Democrat analyzes this contrast and the effect on his leading indicators.
  • Philly Fed also beat expectations.
  • Existing home sales rose 3.2%. Calculated Risk is the go-to source on housing, and Bill continues his analysis of the effects of the small inventory. This concept is essential to understanding housing trends.

  • Industrial production registered a (small) increase of 0.1%. Steven Hansen notes that the year-over-year figure is still in contraction.
  • Hotel occupancy still on pace to be the second best year in history. (Calculated Risk)
  • Earnings season shows continuing strength. FactSet reports that 78% of S&P 500 companies are beating earnings estimates and 65% beating on sales. Take a look at the entire analysis. Here are two interesting takeaways.

The Bad

  • Rail traffic continues to decline, even when coal and grain are excluded from the data. Steven Hansen does a thorough analysis of the trends.
  • Jobless claims edged 13K higher, moving away from recent lows.
  • Housing starts declined and missed estimates. The annual rate was 1.047 million. Calculated Risk discusses and notes that his prediction at the start of the year, growth of 4-8% still looks about right.

 

The Ugly

Increased hacking. Yesterday’s widespread outage attacked a domain name service, according to MarketWatch. Engadget says, Blame the Internet of Things and provides the map below. The hacking began with home devices which often have weak security protocols. With that entry, the distributed denial of service attack took down a list of major sites, including “Twitter, Spotify, Reddit, The New York Times, Pinterest, and PayPal.”

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. This week’s award goes to Ryan Detrick of LPL Research. I am showing the power of his work via the two key charts, but reading the entire post will help you to spot these things on your own.

 

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a normal week for economic data, along with many important earnings reports. I watch everything on the calendar, so you do not need to! Check out WTWA to focus on what is really important – and ignore the noise.

The “A” List

  • New home sales (T). Continuing strength needed.
  • Consumer confidence (T). The Conference Board version spiked last month. Few expect the gains to hold?
  • GDP for Q3 (F). Even though this is backward looking, it will get plenty of media attention in front of the election.
  • Michigan Sentiment (F). Has been weaker than the Conference Board version. An important indicator.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Pending home sales (Th). Not as important as new homes for immediate economic effect, but a good market indicator.
  • Durable goods (Th). Volatile September data, but important for the overall assessment of the economy.
  • Existing home sales (Th). Without the impact of new homes, but still a good read on the overall housing market.
  • Crude inventories (W). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

More important than the economic data will be continuing earnings news. We also have almost daily Fedspeak and plenty of international events and speeches. And of course…the candidates.

Next Week’s Theme

Despite the many events that normally increase volatility, the stock market has traded in a narrow range. There is an increasing sense that “something’s got to give.” The exact cause and timing remain unclear, but the obvious choice is Election Day.

I expect an active discussion about a looming market question:

When will the trading range be broken?

Here is a chart of the market over the last year:

If you look at mid-July through today, you can see that the trading range has been quite narrow.

Now let’s turn to the sequence of topics I have written about in the last two months. These remind us of what we were thinking and worrying about each week.

  • Possible rate increase after Jackson Hole 8/28
  • Chance of an Autumn Correction 9/3
  • Should we fear the Fed? 9/11
  • Is the bond correction at hand? 9/18
  • Election effects on the market 9/25
  • Time to get past the gloom? 10/2
  • Earnings recession over? 10/9
  • Market rotation at hand? 10/16

Despite this list of challenges, stocks have held up pretty well.

Many are expecting the trading range to be broken soon. But in which direction?

Election predictions range from a surprise, Brexit-style victory for Mr. Trump to a Democratic sweep. The markets seem to favor a Clinton victory, but a continuation of divided government, mostly because of reduced uncertainty.

At the beginning of the year I wrote that the investment effects of this election were smaller than most would expect. The President has much less power to change policy than most people think – especially in the face of a Senate filibuster. Either candidate would need to forge alliances with the other party to make major changes. OppenheimerFunds has some interesting comments about surprises from past elections, and advice for investors this time.

Data indicate that many are not following this advice. A BlackRock survey (via Financial Advisor IQ) found that 53% of investors have raised their allocation to cash because of the “persistent volatility.” The Presidential election gets credit as a major cause.

The perceived volatility is completely wrong – certainly for the last few months, and also for several years. If you missed my post on testing your Confirmation Bias Quotient, you might want to take a look. Something is causing many investors to perceive volatility that is not really there.

Bloomberg reports that investor cash levels have not been seen since 9/11.

Join in the comments with your ideas on when the trading range will be broken, and in which direction. As always, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in the conclusion.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and also the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies.

Doug Short: The Big Four Update, the World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has a number of interesting approaches to asset allocation.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator, and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. Georg thinks it is still a year away. It is interesting to watch this approach along with our weekly monitoring of the C-Score.

“Davidson” (via Todd Sullivan): An excellent, understandable description of the interest rate cycle and its close association with recessions. The description of the factors we can expect to see before a recession will come — someday. Here is a key quote and chart:

Recessions, for the most part, in my opinion, are predictable. The rate spread between T-Bills and the 10yr Treasury is 1.20% today or 120bps (basis points). Based on history, lending continues, a relatively high level of pessimism continues and so does economic expansion. The rate spread is only one of several economic measures we have available that indicates economic expansion is likely to continue for several years.

 

How to Use WTWA (important for new readers)

In this series I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide a number of free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio, and also less risk.
  • Holmes and friends – the top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why it is a great time to own for Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (I welcome questions on this subject. What scares you?)

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and also the best advice from sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. Felix is fully invested. Oscar holds several aggressive sectors. The more cautious Holmes also remains fully invested. They now have a regular Thursday night discussion, which they call the “Stock Exchange.” This is the place to get some ideas from the best technical analysis – and you can ask questions!

Top Trading Advice

 

Brett Steenbarger provides a checklist to help you determine if you are “operating in peak performance.” As he often does, Dr. Brett has raised a point that few people think about. This is one that could make a big difference – and not just for traders.

The Trading Goddess considers pot stocks for an election trade.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be “Davidson” (via Todd Sullivan) and the analysis of current market fears. It is a post packed with good ideas, one of which is in the quant corner as well.

The past 12mos has seen many a ‘high profile’ investor forecast that a recession is imminent. This is the consensus view. Some claim it is driven by economic weakness from one area or another. There are still claims that employment is weak when it is at record highs. Others claim that retail sales and personal income (wage growth) are nearly unchanged for more than a decade. Not so! They are much better. Then, there are those who claim that recoveries only last a certain number of years before they expire. Not so! Finally, there are some who claim no recovery has occurred and that the SP500 is only higher because interest rates are so low, i.e. high stock prices are only supported by the Federal Reserve keeping interest rates at historical lows. Definitely, not so! The range of commentary covers a broad spectrum, but remains pessimistic just the same.

Please take a few minutes to read this valuable post.

Income Ideas

 

Many investors are looking for income stocks. Rightly worried about the valuation and downside risk of utilities, they seek alternatives. Some have joined us in buying sound, conservative stocks and writing near-term calls against the position. This can generate an excellent yield and is safer than owning the stocks alone. It is a lot safer than a basket of utilities.

REITs present another alternative. The trick is to find those that have some ability to hold up in the face of interest rate hikes. Brad Thomas has been writing on this topic, presenting several good ideas. This week it is Apple Hospitality (APLE). I have been adding some REITs to the yield portion of our client portfolios. Like Brad, we include analysis from Chuck Carnevale’s F.A.S.T. graphs as part of our research.

David Fish has an interesting article on dividend increases anticipated before the end of the year. There is also a link to his updated list of dividend champions.

Stock Ideas

Lee Jackson writes about three “red-hot chip stocks.” These interesting ideas are based upon a research report from highly-regarded chip analyst Will Stein (SunTrust Robinson Humphrey).

Our trading model, Holmes, has joined our other models in a weekly market discussion. Each one has a different “personality” and I get to be the human doing fundamental analysis. We have an enjoyable discussion every week, with four or five specific ideas that we are also buying. This week Holmes likes Nike (NKE). Check out the post for my own reaction, and more information about the Holmes method.

While we cannot verify the suitability of specific stocks for everyone who is a reader, the ideas have worked well so far. My hope is that it will be a good starting point for your own research. Holmes may exit a position at any time. If you want more information about the exits, just sign up via holmes at newarc dot com. You will get an email update whenever we sell an announced position.

Dillard’s, Inc. (DDS): Has The Pendulum Swung Too Far? Asks Mitchell Mauer. I especially like to recommend articles that are backed by good analysis. Here you can see both pros and cons. It follows a method that is quite useful in selecting stocks.

Is the selling in Gilead Sciences overdone? Stone Fox Capital notes the falling analyst recommendations despite strong earnings. Should the stock really be trading at a multiple of 6. The net payout (stock buybacks plus dividends) is now almost 18%.

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, you should join us in adding this to your daily reading. Every investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are always several great choices worth reading. My personal favorite this week is the “lucky versus good” analysis from Jonathan Clements. He writes:

The problem: We typically judge our financial choices by a single, crude yardstick—whether they make or lose us money. But that measure of success or failure can result in faulty feedback that validates bad behavior. Consider three examples……

Check out the whole post for the examples and an excellent lesson.

Millennial Investors

Barron’s introduces a new site aimed at “a new generation of investors.” There is a combination of advice and some stock ideas. I enjoyed the article about why Apple Pay is more secure than a credit card. They also introduce “The Next 50 Index” with stocks geared toward Millennials.

And from another source – this provides some inspiration about our changing habits.

Final Thoughts

There are several points to keep in mind:

  • The market has been resilient in the face of challenges. Look again at the chart. The worrying seasonal predictions have all been wrong – as January goes, sell in May, September as the worst month. We now approach the period of greatest seasonal strength.
  • The earnings recession seems to be at an end. Forward earnings are trending higher.
  • There is no sign of an economic recession – just more of the same slow growth.
  • Consumer confidence is still strong.
  • Energy prices are back in a range where the threat to producers has been reduced and the consumer prices remain modest.

What is needed to spark a change? The biggest item is increased investment by business. Surveys continue to show caution among these leaders, even when their own business is doing well. When there are specific events to worry about, it is easy (and seems wise) to defer decisions.

Acclaimed system developer, author, and hedge fund manager Ralph Vince summarized the situation with a bold call in a post at Daily Speculations:

Regardless of who wins this election, this market is going to rip to the upside — and I can be quite certain of that without even looking at the numbers, just the very tentative nature of nearly everyone around it. I’ve smelled this dish cooking before, and so have a lot of folks on this site.

How is that for a contrarian position?

Weighing the Week Ahead: Will Election News Change the Course of Markets?

The calendar has a lot of data, but the FOMC meeting is over. The market waits for the next big event. We will soon have another jobs report, but Monday’s presidential debate overshadows the other news. The news cycles this week will be all about the election, and the financial press will be no different. Should investors use this news to change course?

Last WeekThere was plenty of economic news, and it was another mixed picture. The FOMC decision dominated.

Theme RecapIn my last WTWA, I predicted a focus on bonds, especially at the long end. That proved to be one of my worst theme forecasts. While interest rates figured prominently in the discussions, the Fed commentary quashed the selloff in the long bond. The ten-year note rates finished a bit lower than last week.

The Story in One ChartI always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. Stocks had a good, three-day rally. Doug attributes this to central bank policy – no rate increase from the Fed and the B of J.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all of the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis grounded in data and several more charts providing long-term perspective.

The NewsEach week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something really good. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

The Good

  • FOMC held rates constant with a hint of increases to come. Whether or not you agree with the decision, the market seemed to celebrate. This is despite the reduction by the Fed in estimates for the long-term growth rate. The market continues to applaud stimulus over results.

(click to enlarge)

  • Building permits increased by 3.7%. This is a good leading indicator for housing.
  • Global steel production is again positive.

(click to enlarge)

The Bad

(click to enlarge)

The Ugly

More violence. Talks have broken down in Syria, leaving the two million residents of Aleppo without water (The Guardian). Continuing incidents, tensions, and protests involving U.S. police and assorted bombings. It is not as if leaders were not trying. The U.S. and Russia have joined to back talks in Syria.

Chicago’s homicide rate is much higher.

(click to enlarge)

The TSA, much maligned last summer, collects hundreds of weapons each week, before they get into the aircraft cabin. Here is a typical haul of firearms. Read the entire post to see the other creative weapons.

(click to enlarge)

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. No award this week. Nominations are always welcome.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a big week for economic data, setting up for some important reports at the start of October. While personally I watch everything on the calendar, you do not need to! I highlight only the most important items in WTWA. Focus is essential.

The “A” List

  • Personal income and spending (NYSE:F). Can the recent strength continue?
  • New home sales (NYSE:M). A decrease is expected, but how much?
  • Michigan sentiment . An important concurrent indicator for employment and spending. Is there an election effect?
  • Consumer confidence . See Michigan sentiment. This is almost as good and usually correlated.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Pending home sales (Th). Not as important for the economy as new homes, but still a good read on the market.
  • Chicago PMI . The most important of the regional indexes, especially when released on the Friday before the ISM index.
  • Durable goods orders (NYSE:W). Highly volatile August data with a big monthly decline expected. Any chance of an upside surprise?
  • Core PCE prices . The Fed’s favorite inflation indicator, so it is worth watching.
  • GDP third estimate (Th). Few are interested in the final revision (before later benchmarking) of Q2 GDP, but this is what goes into the books.
  • Crude inventories . Often has a significant impact on oil markets, a focal point for traders of everything.

The first Presidential debate will be a news highlight with markets paying attention. FedSpeak is back in full swing. Chair Yellen testifies on Wednesday before a House committee on bank supervision.

Next Week’s Theme

Most investors would prefer to tune this out, but we can no longer avoid it. The polls have tightened. We are on the eve of the first of three Presidential debates. It is expected to attract more viewers than the Super Bowl. Debates are always important, but this time is really special. The debate will provide a focus for the news cycle, including the financial media. I expect that everyone will be asking: Should the election news cause investors to change course?

Please note that this is not a post with political advocacy. Everyone should vote as they choose, and for whatever reason. That said, it is important for investors to understand what is anticipated by markets, and the likely result if things change. I have worked to find articles that reflect a mainstream viewpoint. As always, I welcome alternative suggestions.

We have three key questions. Out of hundreds of posts on these topics, here are a few that are good. Think of it as a starting point.

  1. Who will win? Nate Silver, whose methods have done well, gives Clinton a chance of about 60%. Larry J. Sabato now has Trump leading in the Electoral College.
  2. What actions might result?
    1. Paul Ryan should know. He sees changes in tax policy, regulation, entitlements, and anti-poverty programs.
    2. Economist Mark Thoma warns about problems in taxes, spending and economic growth.
    3. Niall McCarthy (via GEI and Statista) has something of a mainstream viewpoint, citing Moody’s. Whether you agree with these conclusions or not, it probably reflects the current street expectations. Also see Nanette Jacobson of the Hartford Funds.
  3. Will Congress agree? Important, but little good work.

As always, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in the conclusion.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and also the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

The Featured Sources:

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

The recession odds (in nine months) have nudged closer to 10%.

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator, and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. Georg thinks it is still a year away. It is interesting to watch this approach along with our weekly monitoring of the C-Score.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies.

Doug Short: The Big Four Update, the World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

The ECRI has been dropped from our weekly update. It was not so much because of the bad call in 2011, but the stubborn adherence to this position despite plenty of evidence to the contrary. Those interested can still follow them via Doug Short and Jill Mislinski. The ECRI commentary remains relentlessly bearish despite the upturn in their own index.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has a number of interesting approaches to asset allocation. This week Dwaine does a detailed indicator review, concluding:

These are just a few indicators in a battery of twenty-one that we examine, and whilst there are no alarm bells yet, the aggregate composite of all 21 indicators shows the US economy the most vulnerable to exogenous shock since this expansion started:

How to Use WTWA

In this series I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide a number of free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio, and also less risk.
  • Holmes – the top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why it is a great time to own for Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (I welcome questions. What scares you?)

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and also the best advice from sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. Felix is fully invested. Oscar holds several aggressive sectors. The more cautious Holmes also remains fully invested. They now have a regular Thursday night discussion, which they call the “Stock Exchange.” This is the place to get some ideas from the best technical analysis – and you can ask questions!

Top Trading Advice

Brett Steenbarger continues to provide a great piece of trading advice every day. Do you have a regular performance review? What does it include? Dr. Brett explains how to improve your trading from this process. He also has a great post on why creativity is important for traders. My guess is that most traders have not even thought about this question. Here’s why you should:

I recall speaking with a successful trader who told me that he was excited about the opportunity in the marketplace. I responded by saying that he was the first person I’d spoken with to tell me that. Everyone else was lamenting the lack of opportunity in markets. He said, “That’s right. I’ve always made my money going against the consensus!” That was shortly before the events of Brexit. That trader was able to capitalize on opportunity because he not only saw the world differently, but experienced it differently.

Adam H. Grimes also takes up the need for creativity and how to accomplish it. He draws upon his experience as a musician, and includes some other great examples for his proposed five steps.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be this analysis of risk by Michael Kitces. His informative blog is aimed at financial advisors and most of us read it religiously. A look at what your advisor is (or should be) thinking about is information you might not normally see. If you manage your own investments, it will give you some helpful ideas. Michael explains the difference between risk tolerance, risk capacity, and risk perceptions. Many people do not understand how much risk is needed to achieve their performance goals. Good planning is essential. He also notes:

The key point is that if perceptions are (or become) misaligned with reality, investors may engage in “surprising” behavior that seems inconsistent with their risk tolerance. For instance, an individual who is highly risk tolerant, but has the (mis-)perception that a calamitous economic event will cause the market to crash to zero, might still want to sell everything and go to cash. Even though he/she is tolerant of risk, no one wants to own an investment going to zero! In addition, the research suggests that some people may have better risk composure than others; in other words, some investors can keep their composure and maintain a consistent perception of the potential risks around them, while others have risk perceptions that are more likely to move wildly.

Another good treatment of risk comes from Seeking Alpha Senior Editor Gil Weinreich. He regularly raises good questions affecting both advisors and individual investors. His discussion of investment goals and risks highlights Eric Nelson, who cites the current fixed income risk to retirees:

Unfortunately, many people still invest as if bonds are priced to return 6% to 8% per year or more going forward. We continue to see significant inflows into bond funds and ETFs as well as balanced funds with a considerable allocation to longer-term bonds. These decisions are especially risky for retirees, whose greatest investment risk entails holding too much of their portfolio in assets that won’t produce an acceptable long-term return, such as low-returning bonds.

Stock Ideas

Chuck Carnevale continues his analysis of high-quality dividend stocks, searching for those that are fairly valued. His discussion of Flowers Foods, Inc. analyzes the stock and also provides an important lesson.

David Van Knapp analyzes which of the “dividend contenders” might be at risk.

Eddy Elfenbein has a great annual stock list and frequent updates about those stocks and the overall market. His clever commentary is appreciated by all, including those who follow him on Twitter. This week he launched an ETF (CWS after the name of his blog, Crossing Wall Street). The ETF will hold his recommended stocks, which you can buy without making twenty different trades. The news is explained in this interview with Abnormal Returns. I also enjoyed this Bloomberg interview, which also includes some of Eddy’s stock picks.

Peter F. Way’s approach measures the hedging used by big-money players. This week he calls attention to biotech stocks finding 70 that are attractive to institutional investors.

Infrastructure stocks are poised to gain no matter who wins the election. Barron’s interviews Jamie Cook, a top-ranked CSFB analyst. Knowledgeable investors can probably guess some of her key picks.

(click to enlarge)

Our newest trading model, Holmes, has been contributing an idea each week, something we bought for clients a few days ago. I will mention it here, but you can see it sooner (along with other interesting ideas) if you read my new weekly column, the Stock Exchange. I have a “conversation” with disciples of our four trading models. Since each has a different personality and style, there are often disagreements – especially with me! While we cannot verify the suitability of specific stocks for everyone who is a reader, the ideas may be a good starting point for your own research. Holmes may exit a position at any time. If you want more information about the exits, just sign up via holmes at newarc dot com. You will get an email update whenever we sell an announced position. This week Holmes added several stocks, including CVS. See the Stock Exchange for a more complete analysis and ideas from the other experts.

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. The average investor should make time (even if not able to read AR every day as I do) for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are several great choices worth reading. My personal favorite is (once again) our winner of the “best of the week” honor (see above). I also liked the “secret to a good marriage” from Suzanne Woolley. Hint: This is a financial secret. How much is it OK to spend without talking with your partner? Answer for yourself before reading the article, which is both entertaining and quite important. (For guys, I advise not learning the cost of salons and something called a Mani Pedi. Mrs. Old Prof informs me that men also get Mani Pedi’s and I am hopelessly out of date. She does, however have ideas about the appropriate spending limits. The ratio is about 5:1).

Market Outlook

Josh Brown, who expertly helps individual investors by revealing behavior of some pros, highlights the importance of the “career risk trade.” Many managers are chasing the returns from the last twelve months.

Watch out for…

A bond bubble? Jim Cielinski looks at persistent buying despite valuations. He identifies four elements and produces this interesting graphic.

(click to enlarge)

Final Thoughts

I have an answer for each of the three questions. On a personal note, this is a sweet spot for me. Given my combination of skills – top college debater, coach of the Michigan team, political scientist, and student of presidential debates — this is a good topic for me. For most of these debates the expert commentators on TV were my colleagues as coaches and judges, from back in the day. Mrs. OldProf was originally amazed that they echoed my comments. Then she came to expect it!

  1. Who will win remains in doubt, but the first debate will be crucial. It could represent a change in what is important. Most presidential debates have emphasized short sound bites to convey a message, regardless of the question. That is what the coaches teach: Get your message in there! Incorrect statements of fact have been pounced upon as gaffes. There is a long history. There is also an equalizing effect. Both candidates are on the same platform. The visual and emotional impact may be as important as the substance. One observer even suggested that we should watch with the sound off. (That would facilitate watching Monday Night Football at the same time).
  2. Both candidates want to spend on infrastructure, which will be an economic stimulus. This will require compromise with Congress. Ostensibly a Republican would have an advantage, but there is dissension in the ranks. Initial decisions will include some executive orders, so there could be an immediate effect on health care and immigration.
  3. The dynamic with Congress will be crucial. A new president needs to forge some compromises on spending, tax reform, trade, foreign policy, health care, and defense. Without knowing the Congressional results this is nearly impossible to predict.

Not on the list of question — I expect a progression of reduced uncertainty.

  1. This week we’ll have more definition of the outcome.
  2. After the election we’ll know more about Congress.
  3. After a few months we’ll have more sense of the dynamics and the potential for compromise.

Political uncertainty has limited economic growth, earnings and stock prices. As the uncertainty is resolved, all will improve.

Weighing the Week Ahead: What Might Derail the Stock Market Rally?

This week’s calendar includes a light schedule for data with an emphasis on housing. Earnings season is in full swing with important reports every day. The early reception has been surprisingly good, creating plenty of mystified pundits. The financial media will be asking: What Can Derail the Rally in Stocks?

Last Week

The economic news was excellent, and the market reaction was strong. The continuing market rebound has caught many off base. This week’s review is mostly positive on economic data.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted that the post-Brexit rally now depended on earnings, especially management discussions of outlook. I noted that there were a record number of appearances by Fed participants as well as the release of the Beige Book, but felt that would be much less important. This proved to be a very accurate guess. In particular, the reception to some key earnings reports was quite strong. CNBC had a couple of short pieces on the FedSpeak, basically proving the expected lack of fresh news.

I hope readers have stayed with the rally during the post-Brexit move. It is important to know what to watch.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. You can clearly see the two big rally days and the quiet Friday. Doug has a special knack for pulling together all of the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis and several other charts providing long-term perspective.

SPX-five-day

 

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something really good. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

The Good

  • Rail traffic is shows continuing improvement. Steven Hansen helpfully covers the weekly data and various comparisons. Part of the improvement relates to comparisons to weaker 2015 data, so it is not all good news.
  • High frequency indicators have turned better – nearly all of them. New Deal Democrat’s weekly update is very helpful for those wanting a comprehensive survey.
  • The Labor Market Conditions Index (recently weak) has improved. “Fred” has the data.

Labor Market Conditions

  • Wholesale sales improved so I am scoring it as a positive. Steven Hansen goes beyond the seasonally adjusted data, noting that sales are still at “levels associated with recessions’ and there is “degradation in the 3 month averages.”
  • Industrial production rose 0.6%, beating expectations of a 0.2% gain. This is a nice rebound in an important sector.
  • Initial unemployment claims handily beat expectations at 254K. The extremely low level of new jobless claims continues.
  • Retail sales soundly beat expectations with a gain of 0.6% versus 0.2% expected. Ex-auto the results were even better. This was reassuring to those worried about the consumer. (Calculated Risk).

RetailJune2016

The Bad

  • JOLT’s showed a decline in job openings but the important voluntary quit rate was the same. Many observes mistakenly try to use this report to coax out stories about net job growth. That is not the point of this research. It is both slower and less accurate than the regular payroll report. It is much more important for labor market tightness and structure.
  • Congress is leaving on recess. Normally I list this under “good news” but this time there are quite a few issues that were not addressed. After the political conventions the return will be brief. Our legislators naturally need to get back to the campaign trail! Maybe it is time to consider a more efficient way of changing leadership. The Hill has the story about work left undone.
  • Michigan sentiment declined and missed expectations. The experts at Michigan noted concern about Brexit among the high-income respondents. (Steven Goldstein at MarketWatch). This will be interesting to watch. As usual, Doug Short has the best chart summarizing the series.

Michigan-consumer-sentiment-index

 

The Ugly

This week our hearts go out to the French. I am really hoping for a week without ugliness.

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. No award this week. Nominations are always welcome. There is plenty of misinformation to refute!

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a rather light week for economic data, with an emphasis on housing news. While I watch everything, I highlight only the most important items in WTWA. It is important to focus.

The “A” List

  • Housing starts and building permits (T). An important sector, but a modest decline is expected in starts. I am more interested in permits.
  • Leading indicators (Th). A rebound expected in a series widely followed as a recession signal.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Existing home sales (Th). Less important for the economy than new construction, but a good read on the overall market.
  • Philly Fed (Th). Attracting more information as the earliest data with a label from the prior month.
  • Crude inventories (W). Often has a significant impact on oil markets, a focal point for traders of everything.

 

The big story will still be corporate earnings, as reporting season moves into full swing. The Republican Convention will grab plenty of news. FedSpeak will die down after last week’s thirteen appearances.

And of course, we can expect more updates on international crises.

Next Week’s Theme

Markets seem to have digested the Brexit story, and surprisingly shrugged off the terrorist violence. The economic data have quieted recession worries. The post-holiday FedSpeak was not threatening. Early earnings reports were OK, but not great.

So why is the stock market reaction so positive? The punditry is already hard at work on this question. I expect the discussion to continue. The market reaction is clearly at odds with what many call “the fundamentals.” If markets keep going higher, the questions will increase. If stocks pull back, we can expect a parade of pundits explaining why.

Either way, everyone will be asking:

What can derail the rally in stocks?

Feel free to join the discussion in the comments, but I see several worry themes:

  • Terrorism. The world is a nasty place and seems to be getting worse.
  • Economic concerns.
    • Deflation – signaled by falling commodity prices, especially cheap oil. Or alternatively–
    • Inflation – signaled by rising commodity prices, especially higher oil prices.
  • Politics.
    • Trump would be a disaster for the U.S. and world economies.
    • Clinton would be a disaster for the U.S. and world economies.
    • Uncertainty. Not knowing who will be elected is a disaster for the U.S. and world economies.
  • Central banks. They painted themselves into a curve, merely delaying the inevitable economic disaster. (I actually heard one of the Fast Money guys use one of mixed metaphors about the Fed. Maybe it was an accident, but he certainly didn’t cite the OldProf!)
  • Market valuation. Markets are too expensive. All of them. Investors cannot expect any reasonable return over the next twelve years (except gold, of course).
  • Technical indicators.
    • Stocks were declining – lacking leadership.
    • Stocks are now overbought and frothy.
    • Stocks are stuck in a trading range.
    • There was a Hindenburg omen – when was that?
  • Weak and mistaken leadership worldwide.
  • Delayed Brexit effects.
  • Global hot spots – South China Sea, Korea

 

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and also the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Risk first, rewards second. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

indicator snapshot 071516

The Featured Sources:

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies. This week he expresses more confidence about growth in earnings.

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

The recession odds (in nine months) have nudged closer to 10%. This does not completely reflect Brexit effects, so we may get a further revision.

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Doug Short: The Big Four Update, the World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

Big-Four-Indicators-Since-2009-Trough

The ECRI has been dropped from our weekly update. It was not so much because of the bad call in 2011, but the stubborn adherence to this position despite plenty of evidence to the contrary. Those interested can still follow them via Doug Short and Jill Mislinski. The ECRI commentary remains relentlessly bearish despite the upturn in their own index.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has a number of interesting approaches to asset allocation.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator, and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. His latest update describes the elements of the indicator we cite every week.

BCI-Fig-1-7-14-2016

How to Use WTWA

In this series I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. For most readers, they can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide a number of free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio, and also less risk.
  • Holmes – the top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why 2016 could be the Year for Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (I welcome questions or suggestions for new topics.)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and also the best advice from sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue our neutral market forecast. Felix is once again fully invested, including some more aggressive sectors. That continues to work well during the rally. The more cautious Holmes is still fully invested, in a diverse group of 16 stocks from a universe of nearly 1000, selected mostly by liquidity. Sometimes we have had only 14 or 15 stocks. That is revealing. Even when the overall market is neutral, there will often be some strong candidates. That is what we see now. It is not a resounding endorsement of the overall market, but a vote for opportunistic trading. I am curious about what it will take for Holmes to turn “mildly bullish.”

Top Trading Advice

Who is participating in the current market? How and at what levels? Know the background before trading! (Brett Steenbarger).

When you have met your “goal” for a session or a time period, do you stop trading? There is a great discussion at daily speculations. I have a strong opinion on this one, but I am interested in your comments.

Do you use Twitter in your trading? Finding other opinions? Breaking news? Here are some ideas.

Why a systematic daily approach is important to your trading. Holmes was barking appreciatively at the ideas from Pradeep Bonde, especially the unemotional focus on setups and execution. (Easy for him to say!)

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be Aaron Task’s 3 Reasons the Stock Market Is Rising Even As the World Feels Like It’s Falling Apart. Here is a key quotation:

The World Isn’t Ending: While there’s plenty to worry about—including global terrorism, uncertainty over what Brexit really means, anxiety over how U.S. election plays out, and much more—the global economy is expanding, albeit slowly, and the U.S. looks pretty good relative to other developed economies. (Insert “best looking horse in the glue factory” joke here.) And despite legitimate concerns about anti-globalization forces being on the rise here and abroad, the volume of global trade is expected to rise 2.6% this year after climbing 2.8% in 2015.

An old Wall Street saying also helps explain why stocks have fared well despite all the negative headlines: The market climbs a wall of worry.

You should be more worried about the stock market when “everyone” is bullish and the conventional wisdom says buying stocks (or real estate or any other asset) is a “no brainer.” That is certainly not the case today: UBS says wealthy investors are holding on to record levels of cash and 84% believe the election will have a significant impact on their financial health, Reuters reports.

The entire article acknowledges some current concerns, but brings the story back to data.

Stock Ideas

Chuck Carnevale remains cautious, even including top dividend candidates. Anyone seriously interested in finding great stocks should be following his series closely. It provides suggestions, but also the underlying reasoning and data.

Barron’s has a cover story on Royal Dutch Shell. The analysis covers dividends, cost-cutting, and oil prices. Even if you do not agree with the conclusion, this is an interesting approach.

Barron’s also cites Madison Square Garden as almost 60% undervalued on a sum-of-the parts analysis of trophy properties. Once again, this combines an interesting pick with a useful method of analysis.

2016_07_18_cmyk_NL_

Market Overview and Outlook

Traders see a conspiracy to keep the market higher. (Art Cashin). I believe that Art is accurately conveying a widespread sentiment.

The Fear and Greed Trader has a nice overall market summary, providing a refreshing balance to the normal daily news. It is a comprehensive summary and well worth reading in its entirety, but here is a key quotation:

The new highs are being dismissed for one reason or another. Maybe those that are saying that are on to something. I prefer that investors, do some research, draw a conclusion, and exhort all to run far away from the rhetoric that has been wrong now for months and years.

I don’t know where the S&P can trade to now with any certainty as momentum is hard to quantify. What I do know is that the entire market dynamic has now changed given this breakout.

Eddy Elfenbein is musing about Dow 20,000, which he thinks might happen this year.

I agree that this is a good time to buy or own stocks, even for those who have missed out so far. Please check out my own recent update on the market potential and how to find the best stocks and sectors.

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. The average investor should make time (even if not able to read AR every day as I do) for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are several great choices worth reading, but my favorite is the simple and accurate message from Carl Richards:

When I first start working with clients, there’s a period of time I refer to as the financial pornography detox. It’s when you’ll get calls from clients wanting to know what they should do based on what some talking head said or some headline they read. Your job as a real financial advisor is to help them detox from this nonsense and understand they don’t need to do pay any attention to this so-called investment news.

Check the full post for the helpful illustration and the full podcast.

Brexit News

There is continuing interest about implications beyond the immediate effects. I follow these developments in three different ways.

  • Fundamental economics. Focus Economics has an excellent update on expectations for the UK as well as implications for other countries. (See also).

focuseconomics_uk_afterbrexit_infographic

 

  • Earnings data. We know the outlook is important. What sort of factors are coming up in the conference calls? FactSet offers this distribution:

FactSet earnings calls

  • Extra “color” from the earnings calls. Avondale does a great job with this. I found the JP Morgan comments on loan demand and spending to be especially interesting.

Value Stocks

Value strategies have lagged for the last few years. This year the trend seems to be shifting. (The Capital Spectator).

R1000.val_.gro_.2016-07-13

Watch out for….

Any story mentioning the “aging bull.” This popular theme has been taken up by some of the best sources – probably because it resonates with the instincts of the average reader. It is now competing with “self-taught in Austrian economics” as the most dangerous phrase in the investment lexicon. I will omit citing the multiple references last week, but do not be convinced. There is no relationship between the length of a bull market and the expected number of years remaining.

Even bond king Gundlach warns about the current risk in bonds, with the setup in the ten-year Treasury the “worst in his career.”

 

Final Thoughts

The simple reason for the market rally? Many stocks were priced as if we were already in a recession. As the economic data refuted this notion, prices partially normalized. There is plenty of remaining room, especially in economically sensitive sectors.

Of course there is plenty to worry about. Everyone should be aware of national and world problems, and try to act constructively. Compassion toward those suffering is in the nature of most people, regardless of their values or religious background.

When you think about investments, the problem is sharply different. It is expected and even desirable that the world is filled with problems. The challenge is to understand which problems are actually meaningful for your investments.

One way to keep your eye on the ball (since it is baseball season) is to evaluate the impact of any events on corporate earnings. Look at overall earnings, sectors, and stocks. Be specific. Do not use any lightweight arguments like “the first domino” or “if you see one cockroach.” Brian Gilmartin’s work is a great source for regular updates on earnings trends, combined with his insights. His latest post notes the reversal in both earnings and revenue, a turning point that he accurately predicted.

If your disciplined investigation cannot determine a link to profits, the news may still be very bad — but not for your investments. Embrace times when everyone else seems to have emotional worries.

Afterword – Worries Circa 2010

From one of my key posts in 2010. Please look at the reasons why so many were depressed about the market six years ago. You probably do not even remember some of them, but they were prominent at the time.

Here is a list of worries that I have noted, in no particular order:

  • ETF liquidation doomsday scenario
  • Flash crash — and overall worries about market manipulation
  • Bush-era tax cut expiration
  • Collapse of the euro and/or European Union
  • The Hindenburg Omen
  • Increase in US budget deficits
  • Ominous head-and-shoulders pattern in market averages
  • Dow 5000
  • Dow 2000
  • Dow 1000
  • The collapse of the US consumer
  • The double-dip recession
  • Sell in May
  • Sell in October
  • Sell, Mortimer, Sell (OK, I sneaked that one in for those who know).
  • The BP spill
  • Fear of Obama
  • Obamacare
  • Weakness in the dollar
  • Strength in the dollar
  • Weakness in China’s economy
  • Strength in China, leading to higher rates
  • Korea
  • Iran
  • Initial claims spiking to over 500K
  • Initial claims falling, but results skewed by seasonality
  • Shadow housing inventory
  • Foreclosure robo signing
  • Overstated and exaggerated corporate earnings
  • Fed blunders — QE II
  • High frequency trading
  • Worldwide collapse and deflation
  • Worldwide hyperinflation

 

The single most important thing for the investor to understand — right now — is the value of worries.  If you are looking for good investment returns, you need a time when others are worried.

The concept of the “wall of worry” is difficult for the average investor.  They seem to think it is bad when there are many worries.  In fact, the lack of worry is a sign of a market top.  Let me simplify.

Here is the image of the market top:  “What?  Me Worry?”

6a00d83451ddb269e20148c6fca9d9970c-450wi

 

Weighing the Week Ahead: What Does the Brexit Vote Mean for Financial Markets?

This week’s economic calendar is a little light on data, but it packs plenty of important news. Last week I suggested that the Brexit build-up would become the dominant theme. Nothing has changed. Expect daily stories on three Brexit themes:

  1. What UK voters should do;
  2. Predictions about the result; and
  3. Consequences for financial markets.

While financial media will cover all, my attention will be on the third. What Will the Brexit Result Mean for Financial Markets?

Last Week

There was little economic news. The biggest change was the reaction to the FOMC meeting.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted a week divided between two themes—first the Fed, and then Brexit. It was indeed a two-story week, with an overlap in the middle. The Fed decision was greeted positively for a few minutes, and then the tide shifted.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. You can clearly see the slightly delayed reaction to the Fed announcement. Doug has a special knack for pulling together all of the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis and several other charts providing long-term perspective.

SPX-five-day

 

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something really good. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

 

The Good

  • Sea container counts are showing some rebound from the recent soft patch, but we remain well off the highs. (Steven Hansen at GEI).
  • Earnings estimates are strengthening. Check out Brian Gilmartin’s analysis for a detailed look at which sectors and by how much.
  • Fund manager asset allocations to equities remain near an eight-year low. On a contrarian basis, this is bullish for stocks. (Urban Camel).

fund-managers-asset-allocations-percent-cash-june_baml

  • Retail Sales were strong, in both real terms and per capita (New Deal Democrat). More people are shopping online, which makes interpretation of sales more challenging. Doug Short has multiple charts and a “Big Four” update. Ed Yardeni has the online story.

Yardeni online shopping

  • Housing showed strength. The picture remains complicated and a bit mixed.
    • Housing starts met expectations, had revisions for prior months, and an increase of 9.5% over last year. (Calculated Risk)
    • Doug Short analyzes the secular trends in both building permits and housing starts.Housing-Permits-and-Starts-population-adjusted

     

    • NAHB builder confidence increased to 60, up from 58 and well above the expansion signal of 50. (Calculated Risk)

The Bad

  • Industrial production fell 0.4%. This remains the weak spot in the economic data.
  • Foreigners are selling U.S. equities. The pace is an all-time high according to Torsten Sløk, Ph.D., Deutsche Bank Securities via Barry Ritholtz. Check out the chart.
  • The rail contraction continues. Steven Hansen at GEI has his regular update on this story.
  • Jobless claims edged higher. But still reasonable at 277K.
  • Lowered Fed expectations recognize slower growth. Most market participants do not expect lower interest rates to solve this problem. Bloomberg has a good summary of the Yellen conference, including various viewpoints.

 

The Ugly

Continuing violence and terror. The mass shooting casualties have been getting worse.

 

massshoot_jun16a-1

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. No award this week. Nominations are always welcome.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a relatively light week for economic data, but a big one for news. I highlight only the most important items, helping us all to focus.

The “A” List

  • The Brexit vote (F). The vote is Thursday, but results will not be available until Friday trading.
  • New home sales (Th). Can recent strength continue?
  • Michigan sentiment (F). Good indicator for employment and spending – remains near highs.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Existing home sales (W). Less direct impact than new home sales, but a good read on the housing market.
  • Durable goods (Th). A decline is expected in this volatile series, but how big?
  • Bank stress test results (Th). Mostly important to a few banks, but also a measure of overall financial health.
  • Crude inventories (W). Often has a significant impact on oil markets, a focal point for traders of everything.

 

Chair Yellen will provide her semi-annual Congressional testimony to the Senate on Tuesday and the House on Wednesday. The question periods will be closely watched. You might think there is nothing left to learn after last week’s FOMC decision and press conference, but any fresh hints will get attention. We also have a resumption of appearances by other Fed participants.

 

Next Week’s Theme

 

Anyone whose breath can fog a mirror is being asked about his or her opinion of what the Brits should do. That is a lively topic, but not one for us.

The outcome of the vote is important, but the prospects seem to change daily. Again, not a good topic for us.

While the financial media theme for the week ahead will be broader, the key point will be:

What does the Brexit vote mean for financial markets?

I have read scores of articles on this topic, watched webinars from experts, and listened to (some of) the punditry. While it is part of my job, most investors do not want to do this. I will try to provide a few key points as background. Read some of these links, draw your own conclusions, and compare them with mine at the end of this post.

  1. How does Brexit compare to other perceived crises? Josh Brown notes the $140 billion of net equity outflows and compares the VIX level to prior incidents. Concerns are higher than for interest rate hikes or the Presidential election. (Bloomberg)
  2. Some suggest that we should expect chaos – and then damage control. (Bloomberg)

Bloomberg Damage Control

  1. The impact on U.S. markets should be modest. (CNBC and also David Merkel)
  2. Brexit would hurt trade, the global economy and stocks, and especially revenues from certain sectors.

FactSet UK Revenue Exposure by Sector

  1. Last but certainly not least, a chart-based background guide to Brexit (The Economist) Here is a sample:

20160227_woc220

And a tabular summary of the issues:

20151024_WOC501_2

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and also the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Risk first, rewards second. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

The Featured Sources:

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies. This week he expresses more confidence about growth in earnings.

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature the recession analysis, Dwaine also has a number of interesting approaches to asset allocation.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator, and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. His latest update features his unemployment rate recession indicator. A recession is unlikely “any time soon.”

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Doug Short: The Big Four Update, the World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

The ECRI has been dropped from our weekly update. It was not so much because of the bad call in 2011, but the stubborn adherence to this position despite plenty of evidence to the contrary. Those interest can still follow them via Doug Short and Jill Mislinski. The ECRI commentary remains relentlessly bearish despite the upturn in their own index.

How to Use WTWA

In this series I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. For most readers, they can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide a number of free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio, and also less risk.
  • Felix and Holmes – top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why 2016 could be the Year for Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (I welcome questions or suggestions for new topics.)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and also the best advice from sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue our neutral market forecast. Felix is fully invested, but the sector balance has become more aggressive. Many sectors remain in the penalty box. The (usually) more cautious Holmes is once again fully invested. Holmes uses a universe of nearly 1000 stocks, selected mostly by liquidity. Even when the overall market is neutral, there will often be some strong candidates. That is what we see now. It is not a resounding endorsement of the overall market, but a vote for opportunistic trading.

Top Trading Advice

Dr. Brett explains why your trading psychology is reflected in your daily life, and vice-versa. Learn how this can be important to achieving your trading goals. As an example he writes as follows:

I was recently driving on a highway and the road split into two sections, each going the same way.  The left fork was a single lane labeled express; the right fork was a double lane labeled local.  My trip was several hours in duration but I immediately took….

Which one would he choose, and why?

Adam H. Grimes provides insight on strategy vs. tactics. He defines the difference, but also provides some specific techniques.

In this case, we need to be very precise: tactics refer to how, where, (and maybe why) we execute at the specific prices we choose. Strategy, on the other hand is the big picture perspective. First, get the strategic view right.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read, it would be “Davidson’s” take on Brexit (via Todd Sullivan). Here is the key point:

High fear of financial collapse! Major investors saying “Get out!”, ‘Brexit’ forecasts dire for European economy! In the US, top investors say Fed has lost control and the economy or something will spiral out of control. These are only a few of the current basket of concerns. And then there is our current Presidential election fare and the terrorist attack in Orlando.

In reality, this week’s concerns have not been much different than what we have seen since the current economic recovery began in 2009.

He then produces charts on a series of key economic measures: employment, real personal income, retail sales, job openings, and the housing rebound. Please check out the charts, supporting the thesis that data trumps sentiment.

The conclusion?

While the world frets and then frets some more, economic activity has continued to expand. Eventually, investors have never failed to turn more optimistic and remain so for several years. It is this period of optimism from which excess economic activity derives. It should be readily apparent that while economic activity continues to expand, optimism and economic excess is not part of the current equation. It could said that “Excess pessimism does not produce excess economic activity!” There is no economic correction on the horizon. This does not mean that we could not have a dip in market prices at any point in time for other reasons. Dips should not matter for long-term investors. I anticipate taking action only once economic fundamentals indicate a correction is likely.

 

Stock Ideas

David Fish updates the list of Dividend Challengers. There are many specific ideas, so check it out.

Chuck Carnevale emphasizes the importance of valuation on your entry point, even when buying a great dividend stock. He has a great example of how waiting for the right entry point (even though a dividend was missed) actually added to total dividends in the long run.

 

Energy Perspectives

We have some interesting themes this week. Figuring out the stock implications will require some more thought. I am working on it, and I welcome comments.

  • Peak Fossil Fuels for Electricity, by Tom Randall at Bloomberg. Watch out for both coal and natural gas. Eight key points, including the upcoming domination of solar.

-1x-1

  • Billions in proven shale oil reserves suddenly become “unproven.” (Bloomberg) Hint: Improved accounting rules.
  • Don’t count on nuclear power. (EIA) The first new reactor just came online after more than 40 years of planning and construction. It is the first new one in twenty years. This chart shows the typical length of time

chart2

 

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. The average investor should make time (even if not able to read AR every day as I do) for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are always several great choices worth reading, but my favorite this week is Andrew Comstock’s What is the most important financial advice you would pass to your children. The advice garnered from a number of experts is somewhat inconsistent, but thought-provoking. In general, young people need to balance passion and earnings, current consumption versus the future, and borrowing versus saving. My own thought? You need to look forward to your work if you expect to do well.

For both young and old: 51 Things You Shouldn’t Do from John Clements.

For millennials: You need more realistic expectations about future returns.

Watch out for….

Chasing last year’s winners via annual sector rotation. Josh Brown has a nice post showing the prevalence of this performance chasing. He emphasizes, “The data is unambiguous.” His analysis and charts show why this does not work. (Felix objects that sector rotation works, but a shorter time frame is needed).

Yield stocks, the crowded trade. William Smead covers this point, while also noting the declining significance of Fed Stress tests and the potential for banks and the housing market.

9a85d9ad1d9f032c9fe14cfc3e5e5e5fe7d12d1d

 

Final Thoughts

 

Brexit is not another “Y2K” as Barron’s suggested this week, but the uncertainty has had an exaggerated effect. Here are my own conclusions:

  1. The outcome is approximately a coin-flip, making any planning difficult. Either resolution will reduce volatility.
  2. The referendum is advisory, which will be emphasized more next week. Members of Parliament will be informed by voter frustration, but may not accede to the specific plan.
  3. A Brexit would take years of negotiation to accomplish, with many of the agreements most important to the European and world economies re-established.
  4. The actual stakes are smaller than most think. I get some information from confidential sources, and I respect their restrictions. A strong and popular (but unquotable) source did some polling of experts. Likely immediate S&P 500 range is 2 ½% downside and 2% upside. The extremes might be slightly larger. This range fits my own expectations. It is all guesswork, of course, but probably better than the vague notions about dominoes dropping and world trade ceasing.
  5. There may be a surprise outcome from a positive vote. British leaders may use it to negotiate some EU rule changes.

And finally, as you navigate the week ahead remember this:

The most newsworthy stories are frequently not the most important for your investments!

Weighing the Week Ahead: The Fed, Brexit, and the Markets

This week’s economic calendar is back to normal, with Wednesday’s FOMC announcement the highlight. Last Friday’s trading put the Brexit effects on the front burner, so I expect two themes for the week ahead. The first few days will be all about the Fed and any hints about the pace of rate increases. After the Fed meeting the emphasis will shift to the Brexit build-up, culminating next week.

Expect some punditry magic. The regular Fed experts will morph into Brexit gurus by Thursday morning!

Last Week

There was little economic news. What we had was encouraging. Once again, markets were pretty firm—until Friday!

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted plenty of attention to the weak employment report and the implications for stocks. That was a pretty good guess for the early part of the week. There were some who joined me in noting the problems with this report and also plenty who created those “rolling over” curves that are so popular. Every day there was another story from a big-name trader or manager expressing concern about the weak global economy. (More on that topic in the Investor section below).

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. You can clearly see the quiet market, at least until Friday! Doug has a special knack for pulling together all of the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis and several other charts providing long-term perspective.

SPX-five-day

 

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something really good. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

 

The Good

Households Balance Sheet

 

  • Consumer sentiment from the Michigan survey remains solid. The Doug Short chart (via associate Jill Mislinski) has a great combination of history, the GDP relationship, and past recessions.

 

Michigan-consumer-sentiment-index

 

The Bad

  • The rail contraction is getting worse. Steven Hansen (GEI) has the update.
  • Brexit odds increased. A poll showed a big shift, with a ten percent lead for the “Leave” faction. The immediate reaction was the this (questionable) chain: lower pound à lower Euro à stronger dollar à lower commodity prices à implication of slower growth à RISK OFF!!
  • Downbeat economy makes June action by the Fed unlikely. Our go-to Fed expert, Tim Duy, looks at the data in the wake of the employment report. He also provides a Fed preview, highlighting labor conditions.

-1x-1

 

The Ugly

The candidate reaction. I have seen many elections where people were unhappy with the choices, but nothing quite like this. 10% of homebuyers say they will consider moving if their candidate loses. It is probably an exaggeration, but still an interesting reflection on the times.

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. This week’s award goes to New Deal Democrat at the Bonddad Blog. Not only did he take on an extremely popular and deceptive chart, he put the research together and reacted in a timely fashion. Here is the bogus chart:

blogger-image--1828015261

 

The chart quickly spread as the “Doomer graph du jour.” I saw it on several sites. There is widespread lust for “evidence” of a new recession. Charts like this are frustrating – so many misleading stories, so little time.

The Silver Bullet winners should get appropriate and timely recognition.

As is often the case with these bad charts, the original author does not provide either data or sources! Everyone who wants attention and confirmation bias republishes the chart. NDD demonstrates that the timing of the recession calls is completely wrong if one accounts for the actual availability of the data. This is a common amateur blunder.

I encourage you to read the painstaking efforts to reconstruct and explain the data at Bonddad and also Matt Trivisonno’s blog.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a fairly big week for economic data and news. I highlight only the most important items, helping us all to focus.

The “A” List

  • FOMC rate decision (W). The Yellen press conference will get close attention.
  • Housing starts and building permits (F). Will the rebound continue?
  • Retail sales (T). Of special interest in the wake of weak earnings from some retailers.
  • Industrial production (W). A highly volatile series, but important.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • CPI (Th). Inflation is not getting much attention. It will take a few hot reports before this regains significance.
  • PPI (W). See CPI above.
  • Business inventories (T). April data, but relevant for Q2 GDP.
  • Philly Fed (Th). One of the two regional surveys that has some market impact.
  • Crude inventories (W). Often has a significant impact on oil markets, a focal point for traders of everything.

 

Beyond the FOMC meeting itself, there is no FedSpeak.

Next Week’s Theme

 

It is a rather normal week for economic data, with the FOMC announcement on Wednesday at the highlight. I expect the Fed to be the focus for the first part of the week, with attention shifting to Brexit on Thursday. Next week will feature an even larger Brexit focus. We therefore have a twin theme:

Will the Fed signal any change in the pace of rate increases?

Will the Brexit odds change, and what are the implications?

There is little to add on the Fed issue, which is probably the most over-analyzed in history.

Concerning Brexit, we have three questions (at least):

  1. What are the odds of the June 23rd vote? The most recent poll shows a 10% bulge for Leave, but the bookies do not really endorse this.
  2. What are the issues? It is helpful to understand both the facts and what people believe to be at stake – things like immigration, membership costs, trade relationships, impact on health care, and availability of employment. Does any of this have a familiar sound? Putting aside whatever opinion you might have, what are the implications?
  3. What are the Brexit consequences? For Britain, for Europe, and for the rest of the world?

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and also the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Risk first, rewards second. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

Indicator Snapshot 061016

 

The Featured Sources:

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies. This week he expresses more confidence about growth in earnings.

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature the recession analysis, Dwaine also has a number of interesting approaches to asset allocation.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator, and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. His latest update features his unemployment rate recession indicator. A recession is unlikely “any time soon.”

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Doug Short: The Big Four Update, the World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

 

The ECRI has been dropped from our weekly update. It was not so much because of the bad call in 2011, but the stubborn adherence to this position despite plenty of evidence to the contrary. You can still follow them via Doug Short and Jill Mislinski. Their commentary remains bearish despite the upturn in their own index. While no one really knows what is in the black box, I suggested years ago that they incorrectly emphasized too many commodity series, falling victim to multi-colinearity. Commodity prices fooled them in 2011. Now they seem to be ignoring the rebound.

Big-Four-Indicators-Since-2009-Trough

How to Use WTWA

In this series I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. For most readers, they can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide a number of free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio.
  • Felix and Holmes – top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why 2016 – The Year of the Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (Please send any questions or suggestions for new topics.)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and also the best advice from sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue our neutral market forecast. Felix is fully invested, but the sector balance has become more conservative. Most sectors remain in the penalty box. The (usually) more cautious Holmes is almost fully invested. Holmes uses a universe of nearly 1000 stocks, selected mostly by liquidity. Even when the overall market is neutral, there will often be some strong candidates. That is what we see now. It is not a resounding endorsement of the overall market, but a vote for opportunistic trading.

Top Trading Advice

 

Anora Mahmudova (MarketWatch) exposes a deceptive chart pattern – the head-and-shoulders. I am interested in hearing from traders about this, but these complex charts seem open to misinterpretation. We rarely hear about failing setups.

Pradeep Bonde has some good advice for improving on a daily basis. He notes that it takes five years for traders to develop the needed skill.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read, it would be a split decision. There is plenty of dangerous and deceptive information about the alleged warnings of big fund managers. Some of these were incorrect, while others were just misleading. In one case the always-bearish prognosticator, Mr. Dow 5000, cannot decide if the Fed has engineered deflation or hyper-inflation. (A supernova can either implode or explodes, he explains). It is all going to blow up somehow, so you should own his bond fund instead. OK….

Here are some helpful articles. If you read them, you will have some inoculation against hype.

  • Ichan is out of Apple while Buffett is in. Valuation guru Aswath Damodaran looks at time frames, methods of analysis, and the perspective of traders versus investors. It is tough work for most readers, but if you want to make good decisions as an individual investor, you need to understand this.

AppleIcahnBuffetteffect

 

As well as the entire process —

Price vs value simple picture

 

  • Soros reports related to his family office. We don’t know why or when viewpoints might change. (Josh Brown)
  • Soros has (supposedly) been wrong on many prior “turning point” occasions. (Cullen Roche)
  • And last, but I hope not least, I have demonstrated that government filings are completely worthless. Because they do not report short positions, you only see a part of each trade. This is especially bad on option positions, where the media report long positions in puts (a short instrument) without description of the entire spread. The notion that being short a put is actually a long position in the underlying befuddles nearly everyone. Even the most prominent media sources provide absolutely no help on this subject. Instead the reporters are assigned a story about the Soros put holdings. My multiple articles on this have not gotten much attention, despite the careful research and examples.

Stock Ideas

We have some diverse suggestions this week.

Think outside the box with James Altucher. He brainstorms on how we can profit now from something we know is coming: the driverless car. This fits my definition of something you will not read about in tomorrow’s paper.

I tried to provide another example (Finding the Best Contrarian Stocks), answering some reader questions from last week about why I preferred banks to utilities.

Sometimes you know the theme from current events, but you might not know the best stock play. I am not a big fan of anonymous authors, but sometimes follow them until I am convinced of the quality. Valuentum explains why Palo Alto Networks is more attractive than one might originally think. Hint: free cash flow. We reached the same conclusion a few weeks ago.

Sector Ideas

Energy prices have been less wild, which is probably good for investors. Some experts are even picking up my recent theme that $50 oil may be something of a barrier, with current prices representing a “sweet spot” for the economy. Oil Insider asks, Have Oil Prices Hit the Sweet Spot? (subscription required, but here is a key chart).

92d34a40-10f3-45ea-b190-fbd2753d56d3

 

Anyone interested in energy eagerly awaits the annual Statistical Review of World Energy from BP. Here is a key summary chart:

BP Oil Consumption and Production

Housing has been one of my favorite themes this year, and it got plenty of attention this week.

  • Housing is “eating the economy” says Conor Sen. Here is a key part of his case for further expansion:

    One way to show how much more growth housing, and construction more generally, has in front of us is to look at construction’s share of total employment. It’s currently 4.6%, and in every cycle ever it’s gotten to at least 5%. Given 1) the size and hence housing needs of the Millennial generation in years to come, 2) the lack of construction, of single family especially, since the financial crisis, 3) the potential for infrastructure spending from the next president, whether it’s the Hillary/Dem version or the Trump “build a wall” version, 5% seems like a reasonable conservative target for how high this will go over the next 3-5 years.

    tumblr_inline_o8axtpc21f1rufy3f_500

     

  • Ben Carlson asks, Has There Even Been a Better Time to be a Homebuyer? After describing interesting data showing the difference between today’s houses and those built in 1973, he summarizes:

    Houses today also have wireless Internet connectivity, better appliances, and are generally more energy efficient. They aren’t making enough of them in my estimation — and I may be stating the obvious here — but new homes today look better, have more features and are higher quality than those built in the past.

    To summarize — houses today have fewer people living in them with more space, more bedrooms, more bathrooms and more comfortable living conditions.

    But wait…there’s more.

    Mortgage rates are at record lows:

    Screen-Shot-2016-06-06-at-11.16.55-AM

  • Ivy Zelman, a leading housing expert noted for frank and accurate analysis, did an interview with Barron’s. Here is a key quotation:

    Barron’s: April new home sales soared 17%. Where are we in the housing recovery?

    Zelman: Four years in. The first increase was in 2012. There are multiple years ahead. We are still 35% below a normalized level of starts, and that’s for a single-family. Every cycle is different. This cycle will be elongated, and the slope of the recovery is flatter than what we thought the trajectory would look like when we called the bottom in 2012. Builders have been slower to see the growth. There’s a shortage of shelter. We’re pretty indifferent whether shelter should be owned or rented. We’re just saying there isn’t enough. The U.S. is at a 30-year low of inventory available for sale. We are predicting double-digit housing-starts growth this year, next year, and in 2018.

    The interview includes a number of stock ideas, including two which we own (LEN and CAA).

  • Robert Shiller (via Mark Thoma) says that fears of being priced out of housing are “overinflated.” In analyzing fears based upon quite different factors, Prof. Shiller wonders, “(W)hy do people still worry that home prices are getting out of reach? The answer can’t be found in the housing data”.

Biotech is worth a look.

  • Charles Pennington notes the long-term success of biotech, using the Fidelity biotech fund as evidence. A better buy than in 1988?
  • Chuck Carnevale has five candidates for consideration. As always, he carefully notes which stocks might be better for a given investment objective. And of course you get a master class in using the F.A.S.T Graphs method. Here is one chart for one example. You need to read the entire post to appreciate the depth of the analysis.

     

426415-14655852213952541_origin

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. The average investor should make time (even if not able to read AR every day as I do) for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are always several great choices worth reading, but my favorite this week is an article from Morningstar’s Russ Kinnel, 20 Common Investing Mistakes. It is a nice analysis of how emotions interfere with decision making and the need for planning. Here are two of my favorites, both very common:

Mistake 2 | Basing sell decision on cost basis.
You bought fund A at $10 and now its net asset value is at $5. You bought fund B at $10 and now it’s at $20. Which should you hold, and which should you sell? I have no idea. The amount you paid is relevant only to tax planning. What matters is which will have better returns over your investment horizon. If the answer is fund B, then sell fund A (you’ll have a tax benefit if it’s in a taxable account) and put the proceeds in fund B. The problem is that people have an emotional attachment to the price. Some are afraid to book losses, and others are too anxious to sell a winner for fear that they’ll miss out on gains. What matters is whether the funds have strong fundamentals.

Mistake 17 | Misreading your own abilities.
People who treat gambling addicts say that it’s the big winning bet that hooks gamblers. They get high and want to repeat that high. Fund investors can be a little like that. They remember that one time they accurately called the direction of the market or picked a sector fund, and they forget all the times their calls were off. Go back over your past investments. See what you do well, and figure out a solution for the areas where you didn’t do well. Maybe your individual stock picks aren’t that great overseas, so you should buy a foreign fund. Maybe your bond fund blew up, so you should change the way you pick bond funds and tone down the risk.

I try to include good advice for young investors, but there is a real shortage of material. MarketWatch has seven good tips for those in their 30’s. Many boomers wish they had known these when they were younger!

Watch out for….

Hedge funds (and similar opportunities). Rachael Levy explains, The secret to investing in hedge funds.

Cambridge Associates is one of the biggest investment consultants advising pensions and others on which funds to choose.

Their secret to picking hedge funds: avoid almost all of them.

“We think about 5% of the entire universe could be on a list of potential funds to look at,” Joe Marenda, a managing director at Cambridge, told Business Insider.

 

Final Thoughts

 

There could be a lot of volatility this week – important for traders, but pretty meaningless for investors. At least for those who keep their heads.

I expect nothing meaningful from the Fed meeting, but that will not stop the punditry. There will be massive efforts to infer something.

The Brexit story will include updated odds and I expect it to be the theme next week. I have no special insight about how this will turn out. I am watching my sources closely, especially concerning the possible economic impacts. I was accurate last week in noting this has something to watch, but no one really has a good handle on the implications.

Traders can try to guess the outcome and the reaction. Investors should approach the week ahead with a shopping list. Get ready to take advantage of opportunities. In this WTWA I tried to provide special emphasis on stock ideas. I hope it will provide some ideas for your own research.

Weighing the Week Ahead: What is the Risk/Reward for Stocks?

This week’s economic calendar is loaded, and packed into a holiday-shortened week. There will also be plenty of FedSpeak, encouraging the favorite game of not just reporting data, but wondering how the Fed will see it.

When it comes time to put it all together, pundits will be asking:

What is the risk/reward tradeoff for stocks?

Last Week

The news was very good, and the market responded.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted that the pundits would be focused on the oil price rally and what it meant for investors in stocks. That was a good call, with the theme continuing through week’s end. Several sources even cited both the recent strength and the apparent ceiling at $50/barrel. As a bonus, the strong housing data revived the “springtime for housing” theme from two weeks ago. Despite the competition from election news, these were important stories. If you prepared in advance, you were better able to handle the news.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short. He has a special knack for pulling together all of the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post where he adds analysis and several other charts providing long-term perspective.

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The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something really good. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

The most important economic and market news was quite good.

The Good

  • Q1 GDP was revised higher, up 0.8% instead of 0.5. This is old news, but it does provide a slightly stronger base for the year. More importantly, the current data suggests that Q2 will be much stronger – some estimates now reaching 3 %.
  • Jobless claims declined again, to 268K. People are not losing jobs, especially when considering the higher working population. We also need job creation. Bespoke has the story, and a great chart.

     

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  • Industrial production jumped 5.8%, the most in eighteen months. Utilities were behind much of the gain.
  • The Michigan sentiment index showed a surprising increase of 5.7 points, for the highest reading in nearly a year. Jill Mislinski provides a complete analysis and Doug Short’s chart. You can readily see that the index is back at healthy levels, topped only by the Y2K era.

Michigan-consumer-sentiment-index

 

  • Housing data showed real strength.
    • Pending home sales popped 5.1%. (Calculated Risk)
    • New homes sales had the best showing since 2008. Inventory is now down to 4.7 months. (Calculated Risk)

NHSApr2016

The Bad

  • April durable goods fell 0.8%, worse than expectations of a 0.3% decline. (BI).
  • Transportation “stunk in April” according to New Deal Democrat. It has certainly been the worst part of the economic story. Check out the full post for details. Steven Hansen at GEI has a thoughtful analysis suggesting that this was a “huge recession which never came.” Think about coal.
  • Puerto Rico debt measure is stalled in the Senate after progress in the House. This represents more than the specific issue. It is something of a litmus test for Speaker Ryan’s ability to negotiate. That is the real market significance.

     

The Ugly

The vulnerability of government technology. The multi-year pressure on government spending has had a definite effect on equipment. Upgrades that would be routine in business simply do not happen in government. It is a vicious cycle. The older the equipment and software get, the higher the maintenance costs. Barbara Kollmeyer has a good analysis of the problem, including this chart.

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This problem is deeper than general obsolescence. The determined hackers are looking for vulnerable systems. There is a likely collision course, already seen in prior attacks.

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. Think of The Lone Ranger. This week’s award goes to Narayana Kocherlakota, former President of the Minneapolis Fed. Many of those who have moved on from a roles as official participants in Fed meetings are speaking out. This valuable information gives us an inside look. Sometimes the message is that we are making too many unjustified inferences. Kocherlakota writes:

Timing alone, though, hardly merits so much attention. To understand why, consider two possible scenarios. In one, the Fed starts raising rates in June and then adds another quarter percentage point at every second policy-making meeting (once every three months) for the next three years. In the other, the Fed waits until the second half of 2017 and then adds a quarter percentage point at each of the next 12 meetings. The second path represents slightly easier monetary policy, but most economic models would suggest that there would be almost no difference in the effect on employment or inflation.

It is possible that no information will be more important for investors over the next two years or so.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a very big four-day week for economic data. (Dare I say YUGE?) I highlight the most important items, helping us all to focus.

The “A” List

  • The employment report (F). Remains the biggest news of all.
  • ISM index (W). Great read on an important sector. Concurrent with some leading qualities.
  • Personal Income and spending (T). April data, but a continuing rebound here is important for economic expansion to continue.
  • Auto sales (W). A strong indicator of economic growth. F150 sales? Many believe this is linked to construction and small business.
  • Consumer confidence (T). This is the Conference Board version. It provides information on job creation and spending plans that you will not get elsewhere.
  • ADP private employment (Th). This independent read on private employment growth, using contemporaneous data, deserves more attention.
  • Initial claims (Th). The best concurrent indicator for employment trends.

The “B” List

  • Fed Beige Book (W). The anecdotal report that will inform participants at the upcoming Fed meeting will not tell us much, but pundits will find something!
  • PCE prices (T). The Fed’s favorite inflation measure. Not much change expected.
  • Construction spending (T). Volatile April data is still relevant because of the importance of this sector.
  • ISM services (F). Not quite as important as manufacturing, but only because the data series is shorter. Will recent strength continue?
  • Trade balance (F). April data relevant for Q2 GDP calculation.
  • Crude inventories (W). Often has a significant impact on oil markets, a focal point for traders of everything.

Not much will be happening at the start of the week, with many slow to return from a long weekend. Expect volume to pick up.

There is also a full slate of Fed speakers, including Chair Yellen.

Next Week’s Theme

 

It is a big economic calendar and a holiday-shortened week. There will be a trifecta of questions:

  1. Economics. Will the recent data rebound continue?
  2. The Fed. Will strong data increase the pace and timing of rate increases?
  3. Stocks. How will stocks react? Will good news be good?

The pundits will circle around these topics. Even the pundit-in-chief seems to be shifting with the winds. They will analyze the data, emphasize how important Friday will be for the Fed, and wind up asking:

What is the risk/reward tradeoff for stocks?

 

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and also the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Risk first, rewards second. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

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The Featured Sources:

Doug Short: The Big Four Update, the World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies. This week he observes that more people are using forward earnings, and many are thinking about 2017.

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). Monthly reports including both an economic overview the economy and employment.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature the recession analysis, Dwaine also has a number of interesting approaches to asset allocation.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator, and much more. Check out his site for an array of interesting methods.

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Noteworthy this week:

How to Use WTWA

In this series I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. For most readers, they can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush and no cookie-cutter approach. Each client is different, so I have six different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

My objective is to help all readers, so I provide a number of free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com. We will send whatever you request. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!) Free reports include the following:

  • Understanding Risk – what we all should know.
  • Income investing – better yield than the standard dividend portfolio.
  • Felix and Holmes – top artificial intelligence techniques in action.
  • Why 2016 – The Year of the Value Stocks – finding cheap stocks based on long-term earnings.

You can also check out my website for Tips for Individual Investors, and a discussion of the biggest market fears. (Please send any questions or suggestions for new topics.)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and also the best advice from sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue our neutral market forecast. Felix is fully invested, and with more aggressive sectors. Most sectors remain in the penalty box. The (usually) more cautious Holmes is once again fully invested. Holmes uses a universe of nearly 1000 stocks, selected mostly by liquidity. Even when the overall market is neutral, there will often be some strong candidates. That is what we see now.

Top Trading Advice

Dr. Brett Steenbarger emphasizes emotion-free trading. He writes:

The emotionally intelligent trader can prepare for frustration, fear, greed, and other seemingly disruptive states.  By anticipating them, rehearsing our response to them, and channeling their energy constructively, we turn our experience into a powerful trading asset.

Holmes is barking enthusiastic agreement, and Felix is nodding wisely!

12 good points from Paul Tudor Jones (via New Trader U). They are all worth considering, but my favorite is #9:

“Always think of your entry point as last night’s close.”

 

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read, it would be the overall market outlook from David Templeton at HORAN Capital Advisors. He covers many of the themes I regard as most important, but readers will enjoy getting the message from different sources.

In particular, he deals with the common argument about good news: The Fed will raise rates. He writes as follows:

Historically though, the initial moves in rate increases by the Fed is pursued to get rates back to a more normal level. As a result, when interest rates are increased from a level below 5% stocks tend to rise. In short, below the 5% level there is a positive correlation between interest rates and stocks.

correlation rates market

Stock Ideas

Chuck Carnevale has a terrific follow-up to his prior article on Emerson Electric (EMR). Individual investors who do their own stock picking should read this carefully. Not only does he provide great analysis and advice about entry points, it illustrates what your research should cover.

Time to buy Europe? Jason Zweig (WSJ) recounts all of the bad news, as well as the depressed stock levels. Is it time to “buy low?”

And for income investors – always consider the dividend kings. Here are eighteen companies that have increased dividends for at least 50 years. If that level of income is enough, this kind of stock may be the answer. Philip Van Doorn (MarketWatch)

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. The average investor should make time (even if not able to read AR every day as I do) for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. There are always several great choices worth reading, but my favorite this week is from Ben Carlson for his discussion of Social Security Benefits. Here are but two points from a great post. You should read it all.

  • Social Security is a more important part of retirement than many realize, covering more than half of the needs for most people.

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  • Waiting longer for benefits generally helps, if you are able to do it.

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The article also has some links to good sources. Your financial advisor should be considering the Social Security contribution when figuring out your retirement needs and asset allocation.

Older investors pick their biggest mistake – not starting early enough in saving for retirement.

Value Stocks

How about AbbVie as a retirement holding? Looking at the numbers shows value, but perhaps no immediate catalyst. Where others see “value trap” I see an opportunity for enhancing good dividend yield by selling near term calls. Take what the market is giving you!

Energy Stocks

There is not a specific recommendation here, but the information is important. I am watching it, and so should you. What companies begin to profit at various levels of oil prices? (The Daily Shot)

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Watch out for….

Safety stocks. Seth Masters asks, Are “Safety Stocks” Truly Safe? Many of the relevant sectors have been part of the recent quest for yield. With investors fearful about a weak economy – or even recession – something with a dividend yield looks great. If the economy improves, it is a different story, as this chart shows:

 

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Bonds. In the “man bites dog” department, even Bill Gross is going negative on bonds. Mr. Dow 5000 is still not recommending stocks.

 

Final Thoughts

 

The risk/reward debate includes many viewpoints, but the worries usually dominate.

  • These stories are more newsworthy, so they get higher ratings. Barry Ritholtz has a good article on “click bait.” One of his examples is the repeated story about George Soros buying puts. I have two different posts (here and here) showing the error of this approach, but the scary stories get the readership.

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  • The negative predictions call for extreme outcomes (market 50% over-valued – various sources, we are already in a recession – Peter Schiff’s claim this week, Europe and the rest of the world will crumble, or maybe it will be China. There is just enough plausibility in the arguments that many people are “scared witless” (TM OldProf euphemism) If you think the downside is 50% and the upside only 2%, what would you do?
  • The positive arguments are generally modest and restrained. Ed Yardeni (who also accurate downplayed the recession worries in January) sees a 10% upside for stocks in the next year. The Fast Money gang acted like he was crazy. “What needs to happen for that?” was the question. Not much, he explained. A little earnings growth, no recession, and a little inflation. It was a modest claim.
  • Politicians of all stripes find it useful to highlight dissatisfaction. This political approach is effective when running for election, but it is dangerous for investors. It is easy to think about societal ills rather than improving your investments. You cannot improve public policy by making poor investment decisions and losing your money!

For a change, why don’t we ask what could go right? (The Barron’s cover story this week is on the right track, repeating some of our main themes — but perhaps not analyzed as thoroughly. It is always helpful to have more voices helping investors).

  • The economy is not headed for recession, and actually shows promise on the big-purchase items like autos and homes.
  • Employment is good and improving.
  • Earnings may have troughed with the energy crash (apparently) behind us. Meanwhile, energy prices remain relatively low.
  • Interest rates remain low – this makes companies more profitable and stocks more attractive.
  • The dollar strength seems to have leveled off, helping the earnings of multi-national companies.
  • Economic and market cycles do not die of old age. A “mature” cycle has the same survival potential as a new one, despite the appealing metaphor of the doddering old person.

The market could easily gain 10% next year, and the year after that. Picking value stocks could increase your potential, since the economic skepticism has created recession pricing.

Most do not understand this key point: We could be having the same debate two years from now! Or even three.

And stocks could be 50% higher.