Stock Exchange: Are You Guilty of Voodoo Chart Reading?

Michael Kahn, a leading technician and columnist, provides the inspiration for this week’s Stock Exchange. In a recent post he take on a quest: Unmasking the Voodoo of Chart Reading.

This topic really hits home with our Stock Exchange Group. Since they cannot explain their methods in great detail, outsiders sometimes think of them as “black boxes” with mysterious decision criteria. In fact, their general methods are quite clear. Through this series, we share many of their specific decisions. When I review the output, I see it as suggestions from a group of wise friends.

Kahn emphasizes this point.

[Charts] do not tell us what will happen. They are meant to give us clues as to what to do.

Rinse, repeat.

Charts do not forecast the future. They suggest that it is time to take an action.

You don’t sell when the market is overbought. It may still be going up and will get more overbought. But you pay attention because if the market does start to succumb to supply, the indicator – whatever told you it was overbought – will back down by a certain amount.

This is a great attitude to take when employing your technical indicators. Let us try to take the voodoo out of our group’s current ideas!

Review

Our last Stock Exchange considered how to trade a market with a lot of headline risk. If you missed it, please check back and catch up on this important topic.

Market Tech Take

We are adding a new feature this week – a technical market overview. We will feature our proprietary measure, MHI, the market health index. This is a specialized combination of breadth and strength in our proprietary universe. For contrast, we will include an alternative technical measure each week. We welcome suggestions. What is your own favorite indicator?

One popular indicator of strength is the percentage of stocks above the 50-day moving average. Stock charts provides an excellent way to follow this indicator.

Another good one is new highs versus new lows. This is based on our special universe. It is over a two-year period. I will improve the time scale for this feature.

The market health is our key indicator. Once again, it covers a two-year period. It is important since nearly every method experiences the worst drawdowns when MHI give a negative signal.

Comments are most welcome on this segment – a work in progress. Vince and I will provide more ideas about interpretation. Meanwhile, watch out for the red line crossing above the green one!

Let’s turn to this week’s ideas.

This Week—How to Take the Voodoo Out of Your Chart Reading

 

Felix

I’m just getting into Wynn Resorts (WYNN). I’ll admit this is an unusual pick for me. Since I could be in this position for as long as a year or two, buying on peak isn’t generally my style. For my holding period, it takes a significant move to trip my trigger.

I find a few things attractive here. For one, the 200-day moving average increased steadily in 2016 despite rapid price fluctuations. It’s since leveled off, and now the 50-day moving average is climbing. I feel I can count on reliable growth here despite some short-term swings.

J: Are you worried about the company’s sensitivity to revenues from Macau? Those fell 40% in 2016.

F: That was just the subsidiary. The Chinese love to gamble. Look to the long run.

J: At least you have a choice that has a reasonable valuation and solid earnings growth. There is even a dividend. Chuck Carnevale’s excellent research tool helps us generate this chart:

F: I am glad you like the earnings, but I am focused on the price. What is this rumor that Mr. Carnevale is taking your job?

J: We hope to have him as our guest expert next week. He has his own job. I am taking a long birthday weekend with Mrs. OldProf. What about questions from your fans.

F: I always appreciate reader questions. The extra work helps my pay.

J: Are you responding to every request?

F: I am making a list of top choices from the “reader universe.”

J: What if a reader request is not on the list?

F: Then I do not see it as an attractive long-term choice. I respond to email with more specific questions.

J: And where would that be?

F: ETF at NewArc dot com. At least until you give me my own personal email address!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oscar

In an unusual twist, I don’t have a new sector for this week. I generally try to hold three sectors for a period of 2-4 weeks each – which means I’m a fairly active trader. This week, however, I’m good with my current holdings. In lieu of a new selection, let’s review one of my favorite picks so far this year. The Aerospace and Defense sector (XAR) was very kind to me.

I recommended this one back at the beginning of February. As you can see, that pick enjoyed some steady growth until the end of the month. As I said, I generally exit around the 4 week mark at the latest, so it was easy to walk away with a nice chunk of change here.

J: Yes, we enjoyed booking some profits on that trade. What about your current holdings? I see some hotels and also Roadrunner’s AVGO idea in your account. Are you too caught up in your NCAA brackets to give us a fresh pick?

O: No way, but I really need North Carolina to lose.

J: Good luck with that. What about the reader questions?

O: Like Felix, I am emphasizing the top choices from the reader questions.

J: So they are not necessarily your own favorites?

O: No, but there is plenty of overlap.

 

 

 

 

 

 

RoadRunner

(Commentary translated from various pecks, rapid movements and beeps).

Reader PN informs me that I can get better performance from RoadRunner if I improve the birdseed diet. She writes, based upon personal experience in Oklahoma, that the best food consists of “small mammals, lizards, and insects.” Birdseed is a last resort. RoadRunner beeped with approval as I read PN’s email.

RR: I’m right up there with Oscar in terms of time frame. I like to get out of any new position within 20 business days at the absolute maximum. Short term growth is imperative. For Broadcom (AVGO), that’s exactly what I expect.

RR: This year has been a steep climb upwards for AVGO, with only a few bumps in the road. To me, the current price point looks more like an investment opportunity than a peak.

J: Your method is to look for rising channels, buying at the bottom?

RR: Yes.

J: I can see that on the chart, but why not draw it for us?

RR: That is your job! I can’t draw.

J: Broadcom looks good on a fundamental basis as well. Here is the fundamental analysis, once again from Chuck Carnevale.

RR: Once again, I am interested only in a four-week trade.

J: It is always better to trade stocks where the fundamentals are solid.

RR: Beep beep.

 

Athena

On occasion, I’ve been known to buy once a stock has already jumped. With Consol Energy (CNX), I’m confident that I’ll be jumping in early enough to come away with a tidy profit.

J: On occasion? That is your regular method.

A: The stock is about matched with its 50-day moving average; however, its 200-day moving average is still basically flat. We’ve seen a pop up from recent lows in early March. Who’s to say this one couldn’t recover to its prices from the beginning of the year.

J: I find myself asking each week: Have you ever learned about earnings? Look at the fundamental chart! The price chart looks like RoadRunner’s old nemesis – Wile E. Coyote.

A: I play for big, short-term winners. If necessary I will move on.

Holmes

I love QEP Resources (QEP) this week. Here we’ve got a stock that’s just gone through a huge correction, bringing the price well below both the 50 and 200 day moving averages. Past performance is no indication of the future, of course, but in my mind, there’s dramatic room for growth here.

Even a modest increase pack to $15.00 would make spending a few weeks with this stock worthwhile.

J: This is another energy name with no earnings.

H: As we all keep telling you, the market often does not require earnings.

J: There is a lot of bullish sentiment on energy. President Trump has been helping the group. CNBC pundits were enthusiastic today.

H: Who is Trump? What is CNBC? What is a pundit?

J: A sound attitude! That is why we keep you on the payroll. Err… I mean the biscuit roll.

 

Conclusion

Charts are always subject to interpretation. When I analyze the results from our models, the charts are a result – not the starting point. A careful look provides ideas about what the model is “seeing.” It is certainly not voodoo, and my own analysis has been sharpened over the years by the constant review of model picks.

The stimulus from new ideas and interpretations is one of our goals at the Stock Exchange.

We welcome comments, suggestions, and followers for each character. Even Jeff. I try to have fun once a week in writing this, and I hope you get a chuckle or two from reading it. Here is a scorecard for the characters, and information about how you can join in.

Stock Exchange Character Guide

Character Universe Style Average Holding Period Exit Method Risk Control
Felix NewArc Stocks Momentum 66 weeks Price target Macro and stops
Oscar “Empirical” Sectors Momentum Six weeks Rotation Stops
Athena NewArc Stocks Momentum One month Price target Stops
Holmes NewArc Stocks Dip-buying Mean reversion Six weeks Price target Macro and stops
RoadRunner NewArc Stocks Stocks at bottom of rising range Four weeks Time Time
Jeff Everything Value One month or long term Risk signals Recession risk, financial stress, Macro

 

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities.

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose me, although my feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Getting Updates

We have a new (free) service to subscribers to our Felix/Oscar update list. You can suggest three favorite stocks and sectors. We report regularly on the “favorite fifteen” in each category– stocks and sectors—as determined by readers. Sign up with email to “etf at newarc dot com”. Suggestions and comments are welcome. In the tables above, green is a “buy,” yellow a “hold,” and red a “sell.” Each category represents about 1/3 of the underlying universe. Please remember that these are responses to reader requests, not necessarily stocks and sectors that we own. Sign up now to vote your favorite stock or sector onto the list!

 

 

 

 

Stock Exchange: Need Some Trading Room Help?

Last week’s Stock Exchange illustrated how different approaches worked to generate varied ideas. If you missed last week, you will find it to be useful background for today’s topic.

In the last two weeks the market has been relatively quiet. Dow 20K is still a gleam in the eye. Some are announcing that the “Trump Rally” is over. If you are an aggressive trader, is there any way to exploit this situation?

Our technical experts have ideas, which are also interesting for those of us emphasizing fundamentals. Anyone who has worked with a group of traders knows that there are many opinions. While you might not agree with them, it is often worth listening. Many traders use social networks for this purpose. One brokerage advertises this feature of their site. Another invites you to call one of their “experts.” The chief problem? Finding people worth following! The brokerages just want you to do a lot of trading. The more opinions the better.

Our Stock Exchange participants can provide better help for those who are not working in a trading room. Even better, the trades work pretty well! Let’s dig in with this week’s ideas. As usual, I will conclude with a brief observation.

Getting Updates

I have offered a new (free) service to subscribers to our Felix/Oscar update list. You can suggest three favorite stocks and sectors. We will report regularly on the “favorite fifteen” in each category– stocks and sectors—as determined by readers. Sign up with email to “etf at newarc dot com”. Suggestions and comments are welcome. In the tables below, green is a “buy,” yellow a “hold,” and red a “sell.” Each category represents about 1/3 of the underlying universe. Please remember that these are responses to reader requests, not necessarily stocks and sectors that we own. Sign up now to vote your favorite stock or sector onto the list!

This Week—Ideas from the Trading Room

Holmes

This week I’m buying high fashion! Michael Kors (KORS), trading at 42.83.

The stock looks to be consolidating at a higher low from the previous big down move (40.70) of May 17 2016, which is higher than the move before that of 35.79 and Jan 15, 2016. All these higher lows give me the chance to buy here and watch carefully that KORS stays above the previous low. What is my upside target? Well, the highs seem to be lower too…so I’m thinking 48.60 the current 200d MA is a worthy target…but I’ll be watching carefully. If I get the rally and the stock starts to roll over I’ll be a quick seller.

Don’t need to hit homers all the times, many games are won with timely singles.

J: Homers versus singles? Have you been spending more time with Oscar?

H: He did take me to the “dog night” at “The Cell” last year.

J: It is now called “Guaranteed Rate Field.”

H: No!! Oscar still calls it Comiskey.

J: Turning to your KORS idea, have you been following retail sales reports, especially for the luxury sector?

H: As you know, I read charts, not news.

J: The stock looks good on a fundamental basis as well. Here is the basic F.A.S.T. graph.

 

H: It looks like “value” investors might have been stuck in this one for some time. My rebound strategy is clearly better!

 

Athena

My pick this week, Fifth-Third Bancorp (FITB), has started to level off since November’s rally. I like that price action. As you know by now, I’m most enthusiastic about a stock when I think it’s due for a pop. FITB is still underpriced based on my technical indicators. We were closer to fair valuation at the end of December. I might hold onto this one for three or four weeks, and hope for a small gain.

J: Once again you have a choice that fundamental investors can also embrace. I have been recommending regional bank stocks for many months. The recent increase in interest rates has helped the group. If the economy continues to improve, the Fed will raise short-term rates. The prime rate goes up instantly. Rates paid to savers go up more slowly – much more slowly. That means more profit for banks.

A: Your complex methods can sometimes lead you to a conclusion that is obvious from the chart.

J: This time my methods allowed me to enjoy that November surge.

A: Let us see if they get you out in a timely fashion as well.

Felix

I will begin this week with my responses to reader votes for the favorites list.

My list provides rankings within each zone, as well as the basics about buy, hold, and sell. The list includes the top overall vote getters from our (free) subscription list as well as some new requests I got during the week.

J: The stocks are about the same as last week.

F: The list changes, but only as the reader favorites change. I encourage my fans to submit requests.

J: The order of the ratings has changed. Are you going to resume showing us the week-over-week comparison?

F: I am thinking about that problem. Some of the stocks were not rated last week. For the moment, readers must follow their favorites each week.

J: Maybe we’ll get some good new suggestions. What is your featured stock for this week?

F: I suspect that you will not like my answer. I have nothing new this week.

J: Didn’t you just request a raise?

F: Yes. As you know I have had the best performance since you added me in September. I have been better than the dog, and a lot better than Oscar.

J: That is only five months, but I agree about your good start. That does not give you license to take the week off.

F: I worked, but there are no new ideas for my style. You told us all not to trade just to prove we are doing something. The holding period for my stocks averages five quarters. I am not going to have a fresh trade each week.

J: That makes sense. Just stay on the job and don’t reach for new positions. I don’t want to encourage you to get ideas from those high-frequency models in Chicago. They play a very different game.

 

F: So I have heard!

 

 

Oscar

Here are my ratings for the top reader interests. There are still three open slots, so keep the questions coming.

J: Interesting. What do you have for us this week?

O: I’ve talked about oil and oil refiners a lot over the past few weeks. Judging by the dip we’ve seen over the past year – and the rough patch we had in January 2016 – there was an awful lot of value to be found in this sector. I see a similar (albeit more modest) opportunity in Refiners now. Valero Energy (VLO) is a suitable example. Note the contraction so far in the month of January. Our 50-day moving average has spiked, while the 200-day moving average has barely evened out. I would be very surprised to see a correction here continue for much longer – despite the volatility in this sector.

J: Many people mistakenly trade in overall energy ETFs that include refiners. The characteristics are quite different. Crude is a raw material for refiners, so lower prices can be very good. Gasoline demand is important. Twice a year they make a switch from the summer blend to winter, and vice-versa. It is early for the summer switch, but could that be what you are seeing?

 

O: I see what the chart tells me. I just put it in the tank no matter whether it is winter or summer. Gas prices will be going higher and VLO will probably cash in!

 

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities. Each week features a different expert or stock.

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose me, although my feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Conclusion

Our models provide an interesting “trading group”. We see many interesting ideas. We never know in advance what will be chosen, but a study of the charts is often revealing. Sometimes the trades are attractive on the fundamentals as well. That provides an assist for long-term shoppers who are looking for a good entry point.

Be receptive to methods different from your own. You are not the only expert!

 

Stock Exchange: Spotting a Great Chart

Technical analysts dominate the daily discussion of stocks. Fundamental concepts change slowly. Chart patterns change constantly. Usually the calls are dramatic, because no one cares about advice that says, “all is well, keep holding.”

Traders live on stock charts, but investors also pay close attention. Everyone wants to know whether a stock is breaking down, breaking out, or stuck in a trading range. Here is the key question:

How do you spot a good chart?

We have several great charts this week. The Stock Exchange provides an expert-level debate on technical and fundamental analysis. (Important background is available here). Comments, dissent, and specific stock questions are welcome!

This Week—Is Felix right about KHC?

One issue with charts is the wide difference in interpretation. Do analysts see what they want to see? Are the interpretive criteria constant and objective? This week (without telling him) I searched for other opinions on one of our expert selections, Felix’s choice of KHC. The same principles would apply to all the picks, but this is a convenient example. Before turning to Felix, let’s look at other approaches.

This one provides a complex chart and plenty of additional points of interest. It makes a lot of specific predictions, suggesting many trades with moves of less than one point.

 

Here is another, one-year term and 50-day MA. This is a much longer time frame with an implied criterion reflecting that.

And a dramatically different time frame from the same source. Instead of a 50-day MA, we now have two hours.

And one more site, which invites predictions. I am not sure what conclusion you would reach, but the participants have many different conclusions.

The key point of this comparison is the widely differing images and viewpoints. The time frame matters, and so does added complexity.

Let’s see what Felix has to say, and also check out my own conclusion to this article.

Felix

I look for long-term themes, and I have a great one this week. I have a pick without an army: KHC. It is my lone soldier of the week, a strong company. The recent selloffs provide a good point of entry with the rebounds already underway. This should be good for another 5 points.

I’ve had a question this week from A Dash of Insight:

Question from Fred Barone:
Any opinion on CVI thank you

 

Felix: This is a stock I won’t be holding for a while; it has been going downhill since 2013. There hasn’t been much upside. On the other hand, it does rank in the top 25% of my universe, so it is not terrible. I would take a guess that you have been holding this for a while?

[F] Please keep your questions coming. I could use the overtime pay. And by the way, Jeff. Are we working next Thursday?

[J] Next Thursday the market is closed and we are all taking a day off to give thanks and spend time with family.

[F] I don’t have a family and I could use the overtime bonus.

 

Athena

I hope I’m not too late to the party on this one. Teck Resources Ltd (TCK) has been on a solid rise since March. We’ve had the stock price quadruple since then, which is remarkable to say the least. While I don’t expect to cash in on that kind of return in the next few weeks, there is still a tidy profit to be had here.

[J] This pick is not completely hopeless. The company has some earnings. There is plenty of fluctuation but excellent growth expectations. This might work.

[A] The market is sending a message that it will work. I listen, Jeff, and so should you!

Oscar

While I focus on sectors, sometimes ideas get as narrow as a single country ETF. My regular sports channels had a brief blurb about some guy named Abe meeting with Trump. Some of my sources suggested that I should check out the WisdomTree Japan Hedged Equity ETF (DXJ) this week. Much like Japan’s national sport, sumo wrestling, this pick is all about momentum off the bottom.

[J] So you are telling us that you have been following the visit of Japanese Prime Minister Abe? The first foreign leader to meet with President-Elect Trump?

[O] Not exactly “following.” It was on my Facebook news feed.

[J] Why did you choose the Wisdom Tree ETF, which is adjusted for currency variation?

[O] Variation?

[J] Yen for each dollar.

[O] I’m not sure, but on my last visit, dollars were welcome.

Holmes

This week I’m picking DXCM, DexCom a specialty health stock. After a sharp decline on November 1st, this stock has proceeded to consolidate and slowly climb back up from a low of 61.00. I will put in a stop at 62.50.I bought this stock at 70.96, looking for a nice rebound to low 80s or even higher. If we start to rally, I’ll be moving up my stop aggressively. My major concern is that move is based on perceived changes in medical policies from Washington, vs. improvement in the outlook of this company. I’ll be very tight on the trigger if the stock starts to drift lower day after day.

[J] Do you understand that his company has no earnings, no dividend, and no real prospects for the next two years?

 

[H] How have I been doing?

[J] Your picks have been profitable. I also like your frequent decisions to take profits and move on. You are not overstaying your welcome.

[H] That is a very honest. I like that in a human. Next you must learn to be more intuitive. Sometimes stocks rebound before the fundamentals confirm. I often spot such cases.

[J] Are you really considering policy changes from Washington?

[H] Of course not. The price and volume reflect that information!

 

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities. Each week features a different expert or stock.

 

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose me, although my feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Conclusion

 

My first job in the investment business involved a wide variety of research tasks. My boss, a clever fellow, became suspicious of conclusions from our technical analyst. He asked me to create some stock charts with the data inverted. He presented one group to our analyst, and got a verdict of bullish on all fronts. A bit later he presented the same charts, with the pattern inverted. As he suspected, those were also deemed to be bullish!

Technical analysis is interesting, but usually lacks rigorous testing. In today’s example, I do not know precisely why Felix likes KHC, but here are three ideas:

  1. The stock chart is like those I have seen before — descent from a prior high, a new base, and often an uptick.
  2. Some might see this as a “cup-and-handle” but not all such patterns qualify for Felix.]
  3. When we get a pick, it represents thousands of similar training cases, and hundreds of test cases. It is not just an idea with an argument, but a scientific conclusion.

You cannot identify a “good chart” unless you have many, many comparisons.