Weighing the Week Ahead: What Does the Health Care Decision Mean for Stocks?

The economic calendar is light, but it really would not matter. The defeat (via retreat) of the effort to replace Obamacare will dominate financial market stories this week. The pundits will be asking:

What does the health care decision mean for stocks?

Last Week

Last week the news was mostly positive, but irrelevant. Markets were focused on the Obamacare repeal decision.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA (three weeks ago since my vacation included two weekends) I predicted a discussion about the expected change in Fed policy and the effect on stocks. That now seems like ancient history, but it was a pretty good theme for that week.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short via Jill Mislinski. She notes the overall loss of 1.24%, largest since last October. You can also clearly see the Friday fluctuations around the health care breaking news.

Given the time since our last post, let’s catch up with this longer-term chart.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post for several more charts providing long-term perspective, including the size and frequency of drawdowns.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was slightly negative.

The Good

  • Durable goods rose 1.7%.
  • Earnings growth remains solid. Energy has weighed down earnings over the last few years. The general assumption is that earnings estimates are too optimistic. FactSet reports that the expected y-o-y growth in Q1 is 9.1%. You probably do not see that data very often, unless you are wisely following Brian Gilmartin, who has been on top of this story for many months.
  • Rail traffic growth continues although the pace is a bit slower. Steven Hansen has the full story, including charts and analysis.
  • New home sales increased 6.1%. Calculated Risk, the go-to source on housing matters, calls this a solid report. Despite the 12.8% y-o-y increase, Bill notes the downward revisions to prior months. The key upcoming issue is whether builders will provide affordable housing.

 

The Bad

  • Jobless claims increased to 258,000.
  • Existing home sales dropped 3.0%. This was also a small miss of expectations. New Deal Democrat embraces the overall housing strength, calling this the “least important” housing indicator. Calculated Risk has an important summary about existing sales:

    To repeat: Two of the key reasons inventory is low: 1) A large number of single family home and condos were converted to rental units. In 2015, housing economist Tom Lawler estimated there were 17.5 million renter occupied single family homes in the U.S., up from 10.7 million in 2000. Many of these houses were purchased by investors, and rents have increased substantially, and the investors are not selling (even though prices have increased too). Most of these rental conversions were at the lower end, and that is limiting the supply for first time buyers. 2) Baby boomers are aging in place (people tend to downsize when they are 75 or 80, in another 10 to 20 years for the boomers). Instead we are seeing a surge in home improvement spending, and this is also limiting supply.

The Ugly

Hate groups in the U.S. are flourishing. GEI Editor John Lounsbury regularly includes articles that you might miss otherwise, including this important story.

 

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. This week’s award goes to Charlie Bilello, whom we also featured on Stock Exchange. This is double recognition that is unlikely to be repeated!

Why is this so important? Because so many are being “scared witless” (TM OldProf euphemism).

Most pundits, media, “smart money”, experts on valuation have been completely wrong for many years. If you have wisely stuck with the fundamentals, you are called part of a “sucker’s rally.”

For some years, the top “fear indicator” has been VIX. No matter that few understand how it is calculated. The VIX has remained low, despite the insistence of many that risk is high. Instead of accepting the results of an indicator embraced for many years, the true believers take the only course possible: Find a new indicator!

Many of them have seized upon SKEW, which shows that the risk of a crash has never been higher. Bilello’s analysis pushes deeper, asking the excellent question of how predictive SKEW has been in the past.

The conclusion is that widely-perceived fear, whether in regular options or tail risk, does not predict a severe decline.

What does? A business cycle peak (AKA a recession). That is the reason for our careful monitoring of that topic.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a rather light week for economic data.

The “A” List

  • Consumer confidence (T). This is the Conference Board version. Will the amazing strength continue?
  • Michigan sentiment (F). The Michigan version, which includes a continuing panel in the sample, is important.
  • Personal income and spending (F). Until and unless more business spending kicks in, consumers are crucial.
  • Initial jobless claims (Th). The series seems to be flattening at record low levels.

The “B” List

  • PCE prices (F). The favored Fed measure is approaching the 2% target.
  • Chicago PMI (F). Best of the regional indicators gets special attention as a hint about the ISM report.
  • Wholesale inventories (T). Advance Feb data. Desired or undesired? That is always the question.
  • Crude inventories (Th). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

The Fed Speakers Bureaus have been busy. Expect a daily dose of FedSpeak.

Next Week’s Theme

There is little in the way of scheduled fresh news. The health care vote came at the end of the day on Friday. It will be open season for the punditry. Speculating about the President, the legislative agenda, the Speaker, and the market provides plenty of grist. The commentary next week will raise the question:

What does the failure of the Obamacare repeal mean for stocks?

Once again, there is a hidden question which will be the focus for most – the impact on the Trump agenda. While health care is important, the market strength is more related to tax issues and infrastructure spending. Here are the key viewpoints:

  1. The defeat weakens the President and signals lower chances for the economic agenda.
  2. Getting this issue out of the way permits more rapid attention to corporate tax reform.

These issues are most important to those who believe that the post-election rally is all about Trump. More observers are joining me in crediting the stock strength to resolving the election uncertainty and overall economic improvement. Scott Grannis has a helpful chart.

Even the usually sour Barron’s lead column says that an improved global economy accounts for about half of the U.S. stock rally.

Those who focus on the economic fundamentals (nice piece by a semi-anonymous blogger with whom I have corresponded) and corporate earnings emphasize a base of continued modest growth. Improvements in tax policy are an upside kicker. Eddy Elfenbein has his usual incisive and clear explanation of the history of the “Trump trade.”

The single best analysis I saw was from Dan Clifton of Strategas Research Partners. This video is packed with information, so watch it twice and take notes!

What does this all mean for investors? As usual, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in today’s “Final Thought”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular featured sources and the best other quant news from the week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

 

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment. (see below).

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator and much more.Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. His interpretation suggests the probability creeping higher, but still after nine months.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies. His most recent post notes that the expected growth rate in S&P earnings is now 8.41% — the highest level since October, 2014.

Doug Short: The World Markets Weekend Update (and much more). His Big Four chart is the single best method to monitor the key indicators used by the National Bureau of Economic Research in recession dating. The latest update now includes most of the February data.

How to Use WTWA (especially important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have eight different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

Most of my readers are not clients. While I write as if I were speaking personally to one of them, my objective is to help everyone. I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com for our current report package. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix, Holmes, and Friends

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. All our models are now fully invested. The group meets weekly for a discussion they call the “Stock Exchange.” In each post I include a trading theme, ideas from each of our five technical experts, and some rebuttal from a fundamental analyst (usually me, but sometimes some guest experts). We try to have fun, but there are always fresh ideas. Last week the focus was on dealing with news-driven risk.

Top Trading Advice

 

Be careful in your backtesting! Sean McLaughlin understands the issues and provides practical advice.

Brett Steenbarger identifies seven training resources for developing traders, including helpful links.

Are you too confident about your skill at technical analysis? Price Action Lab shows how cognitive bias can lead you astray, including some great examples.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would Chris Kacher’s popular and insightful chart, spread widely by Sue Chang. The various soft times in market history are considered. My own conclusion is that you had better have a good reason to fight the trend.

Stock Ideas

 

Deep value in a solar stock? Andrew Bary of Barron’s features SolarEdge Technologies (SEDG), citing a possible 40% upside. He quotes my friend Bob Marcin, who is very fussy about deep value, noting that the company “makes a category-killer product for a secular growth industry.”

Chuck Carnevale considers the implications of rising interest rates for stocks. His wide-ranging analysis, which you should read carefully, looks at historical macro effects as well as analyzing individual stocks like Johnson and Johnson (JNJ), McDonalds (MCD), and other important names.

Josh Brown explains why homebuilders are strong in the face of rising interest rates.

Our Stock Exchange always has some fresh ideas. There are ideas from five different approaches. Our momentum newest member, Road Runner, trades upward-sloping channels, seeking attractive entry points. This week’s idea is Netflix (NFLX). You will probably identify with one of the characters, and your questions are welcomed.

Yield Plays

Blue Harbinger does a deep dive into dividend aristocrats. He begins with the membership of the SPDR Dividend Index (SDY) and then moves to his likes and dislikes. It is an excellent and thorough piece. In a somewhat more speculative vein, Mark has a provocative analysis of CVR Energy (CVI), including Carl Icahn’s involvement and possible link to his role as a Trump advisor.

Simply Safe Dividends provides an absolutely first-rate analysis of the potential for utility stocks. There is a good analysis of the likely impact of higher interest rates, and how to pick companies that will hold up the best. Especially interesting is the argument for keeping some utilities in your portfolio no matter what you expect on interest rates.

Some REITs might be fine, even when rates are rising. Here are ideas from Salvatore Bruno.

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, this is a must-read. Even the more casual long-term investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. As usual, investors will find value in several of them, but my favorite is the practical tax-time advice on what records you can safely discard. More abstract but very powerful is this discussion of the trade-off between financial assets and human capital.

In his regular column, Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich raises an important question: Can even the rich afford to retire? He cites several great sources as well as some possible solutions. My advisor colleagues should join me in making this a regular read, but it is usually helpful for DIY investors as well.

If you have been stock on the sidelines, evaluating possible worries, you might want to read my (free) short paper on the top investor pitfalls. It is a good test of whether you can successfully fly solo. Send a request to main at newarc dot com.

 

Watch out for…

 

Companies with “suspicious earnings.” Rupert Hargreaves explains the warning signs and provides some starting ideas.

Final Thoughts

 

Astute and intelligent investors closely follow the news. That will be a special challenge in the week ahead. Most of what you read about the health care decision will be worse than unhelpful. It will steer you astray.

Most sources will discuss what the health care defeat means for Trump or for the Republicans. That type of story is easy to write and invites readers to join in the speculation. The financial outlets might do a little better with some ideas about the impact on tax reform.

The implications for investors demand more sophisticated analysis. This was a test of two things:

  1. The intransigence of the Freedom Caucus
  2. The GOP leadership and the President’s ability to craft a compromise.

If a “layup change” like Obamacare repeal cannot be done within the Republican party, the entire agenda will require some compromise with Democrats.

This affects both the probability of success and the nature of the resulting policies. This conclusion is much more important for investors than the specifics of the health care legislation. It is also more sophisticated than knee-jerk commentary on the change in the “Trump agenda.”

 

A Conclusion for Investors

I know from my travels and discussions that there is a high degree of market concern right now. Part of it is uncertainty about Trump policies (from investors of both parties), and a general sense that the rally is extended and markets are “high.”

This type of concern is exactly why we must invest based upon data, not emotion.

None of our indicators currently warn about the end of this business cycle. Business cycles do not have an expiration date. They do not die of old age. (Yardeni). These are emotional ideas that feel right, but lack empirical support.

There is plenty of “upside risk.” Earnings growth is improving, even in the environment of modest growth. The recent market strength could go on for years without any policy changes. If some of the Trump agenda (probably with Democratic support) becomes law, it could mean a spike in both economic growth and profits. We already see improved business and consumer confidence.

Stock Exchange: Trading in a Time of High, News-Driven Risk

Many seem convinced that market risk is elevated – perhaps at an all-time high. I know this from contacts on my vacation, where I see many high-net worth people, messages from my clients (an intelligent and cool-headed lot), and even some objective measures of angst. Whether it is uncertainty about the new President and policy, revisiting issues about valuation, or concern about foreign challenges – it is a popular time to be worried.

Charlie Bilello of Pension Partners looks at SKEW. While VIX has not generated warning levels, SKEW suggests an all-time high in crash risk.

 

Is this really important for trading? It is an excellent question for our experts.

Review

Our last Stock Exchange considered the role of valuation in trading. Deep value expert Robert Marcin provided some great observations. I thank him, and urge you to follow his regular observations at Scutify.

 

This Week—How Traders Can Cope with News-Driven Risk

We have a new participant this week – Road Runner. This beeping bird has a very specialized approach, but one that should be a favorite with traders. RR looks for stocks in an uptrend, identifies the trading range within that trend, and buys at the bottom. His holding period is only two weeks.

After extensive testing, we have invited him to join the group.

Road Runner

(Commentary translated from various pecks, rapid movements and beeps).

R: Look at Netflix (NFLX).

This sustained price growth provides a solid working range. I might look to buy around the 50-day moving average price, and sell just over $145. It’s not the world’s biggest gain, but it’s a great fit for my trading style.

J: Are you worried about a market crash?

RR: My holding period is only ten business days. Major selling takes me out of everything. My method requires finding some attractive stocks with uptrends.

Athena

My methods do not show any new choices. I look for short-term momentum picks with a solid base. The current market does not fit my style.

J: Is this a reflection of very high risk?

A: Not necessarily. The market has been pretty flat. It is less likely to find new short-term momentum opportunities.

J: Are you doing anything about headline risk and your current positions?

A: Only my normal measures. I will take note of alarming moves in the wrong direction, including both price and volume. Even a Goddess cannot anticipate what tomorrow’s tweet might bring. I am reactive, not anticipatory.

Felix

I will once again emphasize answers to reader questions. Here is the most recent list.

J: I did not see the list last week. What happened?

F: A small omission. Sorry.

J: When I am on vacation, this group is supposed to conduct business as usual. No dallying.

F: We were all working.

J: Do you have any new recommendations for us this week.

F: No, but that is no surprise given the market conditions.

J: OK, but please try to do better next week.

F: I have a question. Does adding the bird to the team mean that the rest of us will earn less?

J: Road Runner will have to earn his birdseed. It has no effect on you if you maintain your current performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oscar

It’s no secret that the semiconductor sector (SOXX) is on a tear. Just look at this chart. The price looks like it’s ready to soar over the ivy at Wrigley field.

Usually it’s Athena who winds up taking flak for buying on a high. My approach is similar in that I don’t intend to hold onto this sector for very long. All I’m looking for is another 2-4 weeks of sustained growth, which seems likely at this point. In my program, I’m holding individual stocks within this sector. That opens opportunities for additional pops that might register as a small blip on the group as a whole.

J: Are you doing anything special about risk?

O: You mean my final round picks of Kansas and North Carolina?

J: No! Not your March Madness bracket. I mean the risk of a market crash.

O: There is no such indication in the data. If the situation changes, I will close positions and move on.

I also have my regular answers to reader questions about sectors.

J: Readers seem to be wondering about one of your favorite groups, chip stocks.

O: They are on the right track.

J: I see that you like regional banks (KRE), which had a tough week.

O: The sector is still strong.

J: The news emphasized lower used car prices. The reaction seemed overdone.

 

 

 

 

 

Holmes

CF Industries Holdings (CF) is my rebound pick of the week.

We’re well off of the all-time highs, with a flat 200 day moving average and a 50-day moving average that’s starting to trend downward. In my mind, that opens a big opportunity. If the stock climbs to its mid-February prices, I could exit this position with an increase of more than 15%.

J: Are you worried about a market crash?

H: No. My high-level indicators are quiet. Smaller moves are great for my dip-buying strategy.

H: One more thing – is that beeping bird really part of the group?

J: Yes. Some questioned the addition of a dog, so don’t complain. RR will be the last addition.

 

Conclusion

Markets always have news-driven risk. If you refuse to trade because of scary headlines, you should look for a new business.

A widespread perception of risk need not be accurate. And don’t be fooled by headlines calling it the “smart money.” Returning to Charlie Bilello’s fine analysis of SKEW, he demonstrates that it is not really a good predictor of large downside risk.

His powerful conclusion emphasizes that an indicator based upon perception may not reflect reality. This may seem obvious, but I doubt that many are aware of the underlying elements of SKEW.

Here are some key takeaways about news-driven risk and trading:

  1. Headline risk may be exaggerated – perhaps by a lot.
  2. Do not abandon your strategy and miss opportunities without confirming danger for your specific method.
  3. For some trading approaches, perceived risk may represent opportunity.
  4. If you are trading momentum, you should have a solid exit strategy. This is more than just a mechanical stop.

We welcome comments, suggestions, and followers for each character. Even Jeff. I try to have fun once a week in writing this, and I hope you get a chuckle or two from reading it. Here is how to join in.

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities.

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose me, although my feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Getting Updates

We have a new (free) service to subscribers to our Felix/Oscar update list. You can suggest three favorite stocks and sectors. We report regularly on the “favorite fifteen” in each category– stocks and sectors—as determined by readers. Sign up with email to “etf at newarc dot com”. Suggestions and comments are welcome. In the tables above, green is a “buy,” yellow a “hold,” and red a “sell.” Each category represents about 1/3 of the underlying universe. Please remember that these are responses to reader requests, not necessarily stocks and sectors that we own. Sign up now to vote your favorite stock or sector onto the list!

Stock Exchange: The Role of Valuation in Trading

 

Investors who use valuation do it in an absolute sense — the way we do in our Great Stocks program — but what about traders. When the market sets a price that is much different, it reflects broad-based opinion that the typical valuation method is not accurate. Our models sometimes pick that up. Our trading model picks are based upon technical factors, but these often reflect valuation versus the past or versus other stocks/sectors.

Our guest expert this week is Robert Marcin, the founder and general partner of Defiance Asset Management. Formerly, Marcin was a partner at Miller, Anderson & Sherrerd and a managing director at Morgan Stanley, where he managed the MAS Value fund  (currently Morgan Stanley Institutional Value). We invite our readers to follow him on Scutify.

This
Week—Oscar Eats Out

This week’s picks are especially interesting from a value perspective. Our technical models often sense a change in valuation – which they find attractive. Robert has a different take.

 

Oscar

Oscar: This week, I like the restaurants sector. We’ll use Bloomin’ Brands (BLMN) as an example:

Price has been highly variable, though its current price matches up almost exactly with its 200 day moving average. That’s part of the reason why I would move to make this part of a restaurants sector holding for the next month. I predict modest gains, likely near the $20 level.

Robert: Bloomin Brands is an inexpensive stock but with little fundamental catalyst to drive shares higher unless it’s simply broad restaurant exposure one is looking for.

Oscar: I am shooting for the broad exposure, but I like the price here too.

Robert: The stock is cheap at 12.5x’s earnings and 7x’s ev/ebitda, but with little growth in revenues or earnings forecasted, there’s not a lot of conceptual appeal here for a sustained move higher.

Oscar: How about my $20 target? What are my risks here?

Robert: The stock is still down a bunch and can bounce back toward the old highs of mid $20s, but a holding company for Outback, Carabbas, Bonefish and Flemings doesn’t sizzle like the latter’s steaks. Risk here includes high debt and restaurant industry overcapacity which seems to have hit entire category with price discounting.

Oscar: Ouch. The stock may not sizzle, but that was quite a burn.

 

Felix

Felix:

I’m comfortable with my current holdings, so I’d like to look back at my first pick of the year. On 1/5/17, I got into Shopify (SHOP) around the $50 range. Since then, the returns have far exceeded expectations. Let’s take a look:

We’re currently sitting around $64.84 after only two short months. The 50 day moving average, of course, has spiked accordingly. While I generally try to hold positions for months (if not years), I might reevaluate here in light of recent gains.

Robert: This is the pure play growth company in the group with its business model of cloud based multi channel commerce platform services still expanding rapidly. Some 400,000 small and mid sized businesses/startups who want access to ecommerce and retail get their services for modest monthly fees and sell sell sell to the world on most major internet platforms.

Felix: Sounds like a glowing review! Jeff is usually a bit tougher on us.

Robert: Well, now that you mention it…Revenue growth has been 100% per annum but is now slowing down to 50% as the company hit $400ish mm in sales last year and are projected to hit $600 mm this. The stock is expensive at 10x’s sales with the company at break even levels as it spends/invests to grow.

Felix: Expensive? I’ve been sensing a lot of growth in this sector. Don’t you think this one has a little room to run?

Robert: As a pure play, beat and raise growth company, the stock clearly has the hearts and minds of growth and momentum investors. IF one is bullish on stocks, there’s no reason this standout should stop here if their growth continues at such a torrid pace. Primary risk here is very high valuation.

 

Holmes

Holmes: After searching more than 700 stocks for the last 5 trading days…I have not found a single stock that fits in my risk/reward schema. So, this week I’m sitting on the sidelines hoping some of my previous picks will carry the load.

I don’t attach any meaning to not finding a name this week. But I do think this might be hint for me to head out for a long overdue vacation.

J:  I thought you just came back from vacation.

H:  And I thought you were off this week.

Athena

Athena: My momentum play this week is Citigroup (C). Here’s the chart:

As usual, I’m buying after a recent pop, with hopes of another spike over the next couple weeks. February was a good month, and the 200 day moving average suggests a continued rate of steady growth.

Robert: Citi is my favorite of the bunch. Its’ a cheap stock 10x’s eps and .9x’s book value) with improving fundamentals and a chart that seems ready to break out. The bank has a wonderful, global franchise as well as strong domestic businesses also, yet has been under earning vs peers so there’s profit margin expansion potential here.

Athena: Well alright! Anything I’m not seeing here?

Robert: This company should benefit from Trump Administration regulatory reforms and Fed’s rate hiking process as well. Also, legal expense seems to have peaked and should decline adding more to bottom line. It’s at the high end of a range, but I would expect it to break above $60 convincingly and run from here.

Athena: What kind of risks might I have here?

Robert: Risks include a low dividend yield vs peers and negative impact from trade wars/restrictions as its most internationally exposed.

Athena: I can deal with that – for two weeks.

 

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities. Each week features a different expert or stock.

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose Robert, although our feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Conclusion

Finding value stocks is difficult work. By definition, you’re looking at positions that are currently unloved. It can take time before the market catches up with the potential you see in the stock. The key question is whether you can afford to ride it out until the market agrees with your assessment.

It often seems that short-term traders are ignoring a stock’s fundamentals.  This week’s examples illustrate that value is sometimes reflected in the charts.

Stock Exchange: Can Humans Compete with High Frequency Traders?

Many individual investors have been frustrated by the growing prominence of High Frequency Trading. Complicated algorithms can process new information and react in fractions of a second. It sounds intimidating, and in some sense, it is. Individual Investors would be poorly suited for direct competition.

Instead, stick to what the market is giving you. The connections made by these programs are often spurious – totally unrelated to the fundamentals of a given business. This is intentional. After all, they’re after a quick buck rather than a long-term investment.

For that reason, a stock being walloped for frivolous story in the 24-hour news cycle may present an attractive buying opportunity. It all comes down to the individual investor’s process and commitment to their goals.

To help give us perspective this week, we’re bringing in earnings expert Brian Gilmartin. Since 1995, Brian has managed Trinity Asset Management. You can find his regular writings on Fundamentalis.

This Week—Holmes sniffs out a deal

It can be tempting to make a trading decision based on a glance at its recent chart. Unfortunately, a stock that has underperformed in recent days might be providing a big opportunity. Holmes uses a mix of advanced trading techniques and technical analysis to avoid significant drawdowns. When he chases after a down stock, it’s because he sees some serious upside. Let’s see what he’s up to this week:

Holmes

Holmes: This week I’m buying  Jack-in-the-Box (Jack) a restaurant chain in the U.S. (95.98).

It’s not easy finding stocks that fit the exact criteria I’m looking for. I try to find stocks that have been trending higher, then have broken down below that trend, and have started to base a for reasonable period of time.

This gives me a good entry with limited downside risk and upside gains that may get back to the previous levels before the most recent debacle. I like risk/reward ratios of 2:1 or better.  With Jack, my downside is 93.70(Stop), my upside is 106, risking $2.28 to make $10.02. Woof Woof!

Brian: a comp miss sent the stock down to its 200-day moving average after February ’17 comp’s for JACK as the industry that the “low-end” consumer has taken a breather. Forward earnings and revenue estimates are a little weaker following the February ’17 miss, but JACK is trading at 20(x) expected ’17 earnings for expected 17% growth. Even if EPS growth slips to 15% or even low teens the stock is cheap on a PEG (P.E to growth) basis.

Holmes: Glad to hear you approve! Jeff is usually a bit harsher.

Brian: It’s not a bad pick, depending on how long you’re holding onto this one.

Holmes: My usual target is about 4-6 weeks, though I wouldn’t hesitate to unload this if another downturn became apparent.

Brian: Solid reasoning – for a talking dog, at least…

Oscar

Oscar: My big pick this week is the China Large-Cap ETF (FXI).

We’re in the midst of March Madness, so let’s call this pick a rebound. Not in the classic sense: that’s better suited for FXI’s behavior through early January.

Still, I made this my pick on 2/9 and hung with it for a couple of weeks. Now that we’ve seen another drop, I’m ready to jump off the bleachers and get back in the game.

Brian: BRIC’s and Emerging Markets have traded well since the bottom in Q1 ’16. FXI is the safer asset class in a crowded China ETF market. As someone who was never a fan of China as a strategic or even tactical asset allocation recipient, Emerging Market ETF’s might be a better risk / reward. The ETF is scraping along its 200-day moving average.

Oscar: So, you like this one too?

Brian: I’ve always thought China was like playing the US stock market in the late 1800’s – it is the Wild Wild West of outcomes, as a Communist country tries to centrally plan a free-market economy.

Oscar: It’s a risk I’m willing to take!

Felix

Felix:

Continental Resources (CLR) is my next long position.

The decline here has been sustained and significant, which I find attractive. At $43.22, there is definitely potential for the stock to improve near previous highs above the $55 mark. I could hang onto this one for months.

Brian: Continental took a beating on Wednesday as crude oil fell 5%. The Energy sector is a battleground sector as crude gyrates around $50 per barrel and CLR is leveraged to the price of crude. The stock is oversold and trading below its 200-day moving average.

Felix: I agree the stock is oversold, but I don’t like the sound of that “battleground.” How do I know when I’ve hit a proper valuation here?

Brian: Tell me what crude oil will do and you can figure out what CLR will do.

Felix: Uh oh.

Athena

Athena: I understand my methods are often met with skepticism. That’s why I like to pause now and then and reflect on some small successes. Let’s review my recent foray into Advanced Micro Devices (AMD).

I recommended this stock back on 2/9/17, just after a huge spike in price. Put lightly, this was not my most-loved pick. That was fine by me. Because I had the right time frame in mind, I was able to collect a tidy sum and close out this position near the end of the month.

Brian: A semiconductor company that was a serial capital destroyer for most of its life and long an “also-ran” to Intel, AMD had an impressive string of “earnings beats” and raises in 2016. On the other hand, the valuation is stretched with the Street looking for $0.07 and $0.26 thus AMD is trading at 50(x) next year’s earnings.

Athena: Would you say something like this might be due for another pop in the near future? How hot is this trend?

Brian: The semiconductor space looks good both technically and fundamentally, and AMD is a resurgent laggard in the space.

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities. Each week features a different expert or stock.

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose me, although my feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Conclusion

The growing establishment of High Frequency Trading algorithms has changed the investment landscape. However, that doesn’t spell doom for the individual investor. Overreactions to trivial matters, like a POTUS tweet, can actually create bargain opportunities. Keep these ideas in mind:

  • Do not compete directly by trying to react more quickly to news.
  • Find a method that differs in time frame.
  • Do not use stops that become limit orders.  A random move can take you out of a position at a poor price.
  • If possible, use the HFT algorithms to your advantage.  If a stock is solid, consider buying dips by having some standing buy orders.

Take what the market is giving you.

Weighing the Week Ahead: Will a More Aggressive Fed Derail the Stock Rally?

The economic calendar is light until the Friday employment report. Most of the punditry are still digesting the more aggressive talk in the recent speeches from Fed participants. With many observers expecting a correction and looking for a catalyst, pundits will be asking:

Will a more aggressive Fed derail the rally in stocks?

Personal Notes

I have a vacation coming in a couple of weeks. I will not write WTWA next weekend, and possibly not the weekend after that. I will still be following the markets and email. I will join in if it seems needed. The Stock Exchange group is supposed to keep working.

Last Week

Last week the news was mostly positive, and stocks responded again.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA I predicted a discussion about whether stock prices had lost touch with reality. That was a good guess. There was plenty of talk about market valuation. Those bearish also questioned the lack of specifics in the Presidential Address to Congress – which had a greater immediate effect that the annual Buffett letter.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short via Jill Mislinski. She notes yet another record close based on the week’s gain of 0.67%. We can also see the gap opening after the Presidential Address to Congress.

The rally story is even clearer in this chart, when begins before the election.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post for several more charts providing long-term perspective, including the size and frequency of drawdowns.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was mostly positive.

The Good

  • Durable goods orders increased 1.8% after last month’s decline. Most of the increase was from the volatile transportation sector, but it was still a welcome boost.
  • Earnings news was positive. Brian Gilmartin emphasizes the favorable trend in estimate revisions.FactSet reports that the earnings and revenue beat rates are slightly lower, but outlook is stronger. Here is an interesting chart of surprises by sector.

  • Investor sentiment turned more bearish. The AAII reports that sentiment is within historic ranges, but off recent highs. This is unusual given past behavior in a rising market. I score it as “good” since most regard it as a contrary indicator.
  • Mortgage delinquency rate falls below 1%, the lowest since June, 2008. (Calculated Risk).
  • ISM Non-Manufacturing rose to 57.6 (from 56.5). The employment index also moved higher. February was stronger than January.
  • ISM manufacturing increased to 57.7 beating expectations and showing a solid increase over last month’s 56.1. The Chicago regional survey was also very strong.
  • Rail traffic in February was 4.2% higher than a year ago. Steven Hansen takes the look at the data we have come to expect, including various moving averages and trends. Read the whole post, but this chart captures some key points, especially the improvement over the last two years.

  • Consumer confidence spiked to 114.8, a post-recession high. Briefing.com covers this series.

  • Initial jobless claims rose slightly on the week, but dropped to the lowest level since 1973 on the widely-followed four-week moving average. (Calculated Risk).
  • President Trump’s speech was very well-received. Most preview articles mistakenly emphasized the need for specifics. Commentators right after the speech did the same. My own preview did not provide advice on what to go out and trade right after the speech. Instead, I drew upon experience and the current policy environment to highlight the key element – the potential for compromise. This chart shows the dramatic shift in this Trump presentation, more like SOTU speeches than nearly anything else he has done. (The Upshot)

 

The Bad

  • Construction spending fell 1%.
  • Money supply is drifting to the neutral range – possibly even tilting negative. (New Deal Democrat). Despite complaints about Fed policy, this is a possible economic drag.
  • Pending home sales fell 2.8% and December was revised lower.
  • Debt Limit will be reached in mid-March. Even the extraordinary efforts will be exhausted in September or October. Will this play out any better with a GOP President and Congress? Douglas A. McIntyre has a good story on this issue.

The Ugly

My concern about hacking and threats to the Internet’s weak spots continues. Rick Paulas’s article is not about events from last week, but is just as relevant. Perhaps even more so with the Barron’s cover story on robots.

The article explains that even rather unsophisticated attacks can work on the 6.4 billion Internet of Things devices in use. Little is being done to protect on this front.

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. No award this week. Nominations are welcome. Potential award winners can find daily inspiration at several websites!
The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a moderate week for economic data, featuring the employment report on Friday.

The “A” List

  • Employment situation (F). Despite +/- 100K sampling error and multiple revisions, this is seen as most important data
  • ADP private employment (W). Good independent alternative to the BLS numbers
  • Initial jobless claims (Th). Not the same time period as the Friday report.

The “B” List

  • Trade balance (T). Attracting more interest in the Trump era
  • Wholesale inventories (W). Desired or undesired? That is always the question.
  • Factory orders (M). January data. Modest gain expected.
  • Crude inventories (Th). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

FedSpeak will be light and earnings season is ending. Employment will be the big story.

Next Week’s Theme

 

The punditry, especially those who explain the stronger stock market as enthusiasm for Trump policies, is even more amazed than a week ago. To them it seemed that the lack of specifics in Tuesday’s Trump speech should have provided a dose of reality.

Many will now turn to the most common explanation for strong stocks, the ever-popular Fed theory. With several speeches emphasizing that the March FOMC meeting is “in play” for an increase, interest rate markets are adjusting to the probability of three rate hikes in 2017.

Much of the commentary next week will raise the question:

Will a more aggressive Fed spark a stock market correction?

Some might add “finally”!

The question actually has two parts:

  1. Will the Fed increase rates at a pace greater than expectations?
  2. Will this lead to a correction?

Friday’s employment report will have special significance for those with these fears. It will be the final and most important piece of evidence for the FOMC decision.

Both questions have a bullish and bearish side.

  1. An increased pace of Fed rate hikes was the consensus at week’s end. (Bloomberg). Leading Fed observer Prof. Tim Duy’s careful look at the important Dudley speech (before Yellen) was not so decisive.
  2. Bears invoke the hoary adage, “three steps and a stumble.” (David Rosenberg). As you review the evidence, you might consider the starting point for interest rates, as well as the yield curve. More constructively, Neal Frankle analyzes the frequency (often) and severity (moderate) of corrections.

 

What does this all mean for investors? As usual, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in today’s “Final Thought”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

 

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment. (see below).

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator and much more.Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. His interpretation suggests the probability creeping higher, but still after nine months.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies. His most recent post notes that the expected growth rate in S&P earnings is now 8.41% — the highest level since October, 2014.

Doug Short: The World Markets Weekend Update (and much more). His Big Four chart is the single best method to monitor the key indicators used by the National Bureau of Economic Research in recession dating.

How to Use WTWA (especially important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have eight different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

Most of my readers are not clients. While I write as if I were speaking personally to one of them, my objective is to help everyone. I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com for our current report package. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. All our models are now fully invested. The group meets weekly for a discussion they call the “Stock Exchange.” In each post I include a trading theme, ideas from each of our four technical experts, and some rebuttal from a fundamental analyst (usually me, but some noted guests experts are coming). We try to have fun, but there are always fresh ideas. Last week the focus was on trading an overbought market. The week before we considered sector rotation strategies, with a recent example from Oscar.

Top Trading Advice

 

Morgan Housel draws upon Ed Thorp’s work to discuss the advantages and dangers of trading with a small edge.

I agree. Every busted card-counter starts with the statement: “The deck got really good”.

Brett Steenbarger has so many strong entries that picking a favorite is a challenge. Here is one I especially liked from last week – reading the market’s psychology. Hint: Do not impose your own preconceptions on what is really happening.

In case you were unable to attend Brett’s master class in NY, SMB’s Bella has a summary of key takeaways. I especially like #6. The successful trader finds more than one way to win. Check out the five “inspirations” as well.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would once again be Warren Buffett’s annual letter to his investors. It is full of wit and humor – and plenty of great insights. Last week I recommended his annual letter to investors. For those who (mistakenly) did not take the time to read it, you can now check out the “Cliff Notes.”

  • Methodology and screening expert Marc Gerstein applies Buffett principles. Check out his interesting list emphasizing book value.
  • Twenty-eight highlights from Exploring Markets. I especially like this one: When a person with money meets a person with experience, the one with experience ends up with the money and the one with money leaves with experience.
  • Ed Yardeni explains why the oft-cited “Buffett Rule” gets complicated when interest rates are so low. It is why Mr. B regards stocks as cheap.
  • Gil Weinreich has a list of great quotes with his own comments added.

Stock Ideas

 

Chuck Carnevale does his typical comprehensive analysis of j2 Global (JCOM). It includes business model analysis, the important stats, education on how to analyze, and much more. Even if this particular stock does not trip your trigger, you will learn from the article.

Our Stock Exchange always has some fresh ideas. There is usually something from four different approaches. Our momentum trading model, Athena, highlighted Principal Financial Group (PFG). You will probably identify with one of the characters, and your questions are welcomed.

Bottom Fishing

There are some high dividend stocks – often a sign of danger. Are these dividends safe?

Frontier Communications (FTR) yields 14%. Stone Fox Capitalanalyzes the risk.

Target (TGT) declined 12% after announcing poor earnings and a weak outlook. Simply Safe Dividends believes that the yield of 4%+ is probably safe, but a significant increase next year is unlikely.

How about Snap?

A fashionable IPO always attracts attention. In the absence of actual earnings data, everyone is free to spin a story. Initial trading was very positive. Does that mean that investors should consider buying it at market prices? (Those who get an allocation at the offering price have already made a bundle – depending upon when they sell).

Valuation guru Prof Aswath Damodaran provides the careful look we would expect from a top expert. While his final range is wide (and includes current prices) the overall conclusion is not promising. If you are attracted to the stock because you like the concept or company, you should look at this post.

MarketWatch reports that most analysts have stock targets below the $17 IPO price.

 

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, this is a must-read. Even the more casual long-term investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. As usual, investors will find value in several of them, but my favorite is the discussion of ten things you must know about personal finance. It is important to get fundamental decisions right before launching your investment program.

In a similar personal finance emphasis, Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich cites the top four savings ideas from BlackRock’s clients.

If you have been struggling with your own decisions, you might want to read my (free) short paper on the top investor pitfalls. It is a good test of whether you can successfully fly solo. Send a request to main at newarc dot com.

 

Watch out for…

 

Scam season. One person gets you in the back yard to discuss landscaping, while the other is inside your home, stealing. The IRS does not take payments through credit cards or gift cards. If it seems in the slightest bit suspicious, check it out. The elderly are frequently targeted.

Final Thoughts

 

Your investment conclusions are strongly influenced by your preconceptions and current position. Last week I had an especially good summary of the two main themes. If it matters, Warren Buffett went on TV the day after I wrote this, expressing a similar opinion about stock valuations.

  • Stock values are attractive
    • Emphasis on earnings expectations and forecasts
    • Belief in relative valuations – comparing stock expected performance, with bonds, real estate, gold, etc.
    • Confidence that a recession is not imminent.
  • Stocks are over-valued
    • Emphasis on trailing earnings
    • Analysis based partially on 19th century data
    • Belief that valuation is absolute. A sector’s value is independent of the alternatives
    • Focus on headline risk – uncertainty, world events, etc.

Your choice of world view controls how you interpret fresh news, and your key investment decisions. If you are getting it wrong, you need an epiphany!

The market is rising despite the lack of specifics in the Trump plan and the realization that there will be delays in his proposals – even if he can sell them to Congress. The reason is straightforward:

The economy has been getting better in the post-election period. Dr. Ed Yardeni, declares that The Recession Is Over. He is thinking globally, noting that worldwide improvement cannot be linked to the U.S. election.

Charles Lieberman reviews the entire array of factors, including what to worry about.

Briefing.com’s excellent Big Picture column (worth a paid subscription) explores the possible causal relationships. Here is a key chart.

The Fed rate increases will be consistent with a stronger economy, an environment that implies solid growth in earnings. Scott Grannis explains why higher rates are not a threat in the current market:

It’s very likely we’re still in the early stages of more of the same. Interest rates are going to be rising, probably by more than the market currently expects, because the outlook for the economy is improving and inflation is at the high end of the Fed’s target range, yet interest rates are still relatively low because of the market’s willingness to pay up for safety—and that won’t persist for much longer. Stocks are going to be buoyed by improving earnings and the prospect of stronger economic growth. Interest rates will be moving higher because of stronger growth—higher rates are not yet a threat to growth. The Fed is still a long way from raising rates by enough to threaten growth. If the FOMC hikes rates in two weeks it won’t be a tightening, it will be a sensible reaction to stronger growth and improved confidence.

Worries?

Sure. If the Fed gets behind on inflation and accelerates rate increases, even though the economy is sluggish, it will be an early sign of an impending recession. I am watching this closely, and so should you.

Meanwhile, do not be scared witless (TM OldProf euphemism).

Stock Exchange: How to Trade an Overbought Market

For the last three weeks, the term “overbought” has been frequently used to describe the overall market as well as many specific stocks. What does this really mean?

It has a dangerous sound, and that is indeed the common message. A stock, or a sector, or the overall market has rallied more than expected over an extended time.  What does that mean for traders?  Or for investors?

It is an excellent question for our experts.

Review

Our last Stock Exchange focused on trading sector rotations, Oscar’s regular mission. There was an excellent discussion. It provides special value when readers engage with our crew of “technical analysts.”

To encourage this discussion and diversity we will have some visiting experts for the next two weeks:

  • Brian Gilmartin of Trinity Asset Management, a leading expert on corporate earnings and fundamental analysis reported at his blog, Fundamentalis.
  • Robert Marcin of Defiance Asset Management. Bob is an oft-quoted legend, a deep value manager, and a curmudgeon par excellence.  While I often do not agree with him, I always listen carefully in our discussions on Scutify.  You will enjoy the banter and can keep your own scorecard.

Today’s Theme

An extended stock move is often described as overbought or oversold.  For most observers, an overbought stock or market is poised for a selloffSome technical analysts measure this in terms of relative strength measures (RSI).

How important is this warning sign?

Pension Partners warns of an “optical illusion,” citing multiple prior examples and then considering the current NASDAQ 100.  Look at the interesting evidence in the entire article leading to this conclusion:

If one is going to predict anything based on extreme overbought levels (and I would advise against doing so), it would be further gains. I realize that doesn’t conform to the prevailing narrative of “overbought is always bearish,” but the truth in markets rarely does.

Chris Ciovacco has a nice chart pack of prior overbought conditions.  The mixed results are a warning to anyone thinking about trading on this approach – despite the recent somber warnings from the NYSE floor via Art Cashin.

What do our Stock Exchange experts think about overbought markets?  We will hear them out and, as usual, I will conclude with a brief observation about the key points. I will begin with Athena, who specializes in short-term momentum trades.

This Week—Trading an Overbought Market.

Athena

My approach is to find winners and ride the gains.  Fundamental analysts are skeptical of momentum, but trend-following is one of the strongest historical methods.  The “trend is your friend” is not just a cliché. Principal Financial Group (PFG) is a great example; it has been on tear for a month. That is enough to put it on my radar. The sharp increases may be off-putting to some, but they are mistaken.  The trend line is strong. I’m looking for an increase of 2-3% over the next 2-4 weeks.

J:  Are you concerned that the stock might be overbought?

A: In my evaluation methods, the price action is a sign of strength.

J:  At what point would a major gain worry you?

A:  I like stocks that are showing strength, but I am ruthless when it comes time to get out.

J: So, you do not worry about overbought conditions on the entry?

A:  Some of the best trades come when an “overbought” stock gets more overbought.

J:  For a welcome change, your choice is also attractive on a value basis.

A:  Value?  What does that mean?

J:  You can see it in the fine chart from F.A.S.T graphs.  Let us turn to Felix, who also follows a momentum strategy.

Felix

I will once again begin with my responses to reader votes for the favorites list.

My list provides rankings within each zone, as well as the basics about buy, hold, and sell.  The list includes the most recent reader questions as well as former requests where my rating has moved.

J: AMD is still on top?

F: It leads the reader list, but not my own.

J:  I have had some questions about that.  Readers want to know your own top picks.

F: If I talked about that here, I would be revealing what I recommend for your clients.

J: That is a problem.  I want to be helpful to readers, but emphasizing that it should be a start for their own research. We did have a couple of questions last week.  What do you think about reader Jim Irving’s questions about CRX and CXRX, which he identifies as debt-laden drug companies?

F:  He is right to be concerned.  CRX is on my sell list and CXRX is a very weak hold.  I wish that more readers would submit such questions.  I need my incentive bonus to kick in.

J:  Do you have anything fresh for us this week?

F:  Nothing new, since my focus is longer than the others.  Let me take up a holding that some are worried about, NVIDIA Corporation (NVDA).  This was one of my long-term picks in early December of 2016. We’ve had two major spikes in price since then, followed by decline in February. Those with a short-term mindset are worried.  Since I’m interested in holding out for the long haul, I haven’t been preoccupied by the dips. I’m up about 10% here after nearly a full quarter in the position – nothing to sneeze at!

J: Would you call this an “overbought” stock?

F:  Not on my time frame.  The definition of overbought should adjust to your investment purpose.

 

Oscar

We haven’t hit March Madness yet, so I am mostly thinking spring training.  For many teams the question is whether to play big ball or small ball. In small ball baseball, players trade the long odds on huge plays in favor of more manageable base hits.  Sometimes the small ball approach generates more runs and winning baseball.

On that theme, I’m looking closely at the Russell 2000 Index (IWM). Small caps and large caps performed very differently in 2016. Large caps were generally in favor due to their relatively low volatility and risk. However, I see potential for growth in the small caps over the next several weeks. From the looks of the chart, I’m probably not alone!

 

J:  Are you worried that small cap stocks might be overbought?

O: What I see is strength?

J:  What if the small-cap sector fades?

O:  As I always do, I’ll dump it and move to what is working.  I always like to have my money working.

J:  Does that mean that you are getting ready for March Madness?

O:  That is where a longshot can really work.

J:  I suppose we are going to hear more on that subject.

O:  You can count on it!

J:  Do you have your updated sector ratings?

O: Yes.  I monitor about 40 sectors and hold positions in the top three.  $IWM is a new holding.  It is not on the list because no readers asked about it.

 

Holmes

This week I’m buying YELP, an internet content & information provider in the U.S. (34.66)

Although it traded at 97 in 2014, I have no illusions that is going back there. Instead I like this stock because it’s showing some resilience at 32.5 level. Trading down to 32.5 in late October this stock rebounded all the way 42.5 before getting pounded again down towards the 32.5 price, BUT, it didn’t get there before turning up. So now we have a stop, (32.5), and a price target 42, with a current price of 34.66, I like the risk/reward this setup provides. Plus, I like the name, it reminds me of my pack when I was a young pup.

J:  Are you worried about overbought stocks.

H:  Never!  I let others chase the recent winners.  I find strong stocks experiencing a temporary setback.  I don’t need to worry about “overbought” market conditions.

Conclusion

The term “overbought” can mean many different things.  Effective trading systems use recent trends and technical indicators in quite different ways.  No single method has a monopoly on success.  Drawing upon expert systems, let’s highlight three key conclusions.

  1. Overbought need not spell danger. Overbought stocks and sectors often get even more overbought.  This might even be the best part of the move, augmented by short covering.
  2. You must gauge your reaction and stops to your price target, loss tolerance, and time frame.
  3. Your system must fit your trading personality, as illustrated by our four models.

If you like selling the rips and buying the dips, do not take a momentum approach.  Check out our post on dip-buying.  If you are contrarian and flexible, consider this week’s advice about various ways to deal with momentum.

We welcome comments, suggestions, and followers for each character.  Even Jeff.  I try to have fun once a week in writing this, and I hope you get a chuckle or two from reading it. Here is how to join in.

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities.

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose me, although my feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Getting Updates

We have a new (free) service to subscribers to our Felix/Oscar update list.  You can suggest three favorite stocks and sectors.  We report regularly on the “favorite fifteen” in each category– stocks and sectors—as determined by readers.  Sign up with email to “etf at newarc dot com”.  Suggestions and comments are welcome.  In the tables below, green is a “buy,” yellow a “hold,” and red a “sell.”  Each category represents about 1/3 of the underlying universe.  Please remember that these are responses to reader requests, not necessarily stocks and sectors that we own. Sign up now to vote your favorite stock or sector onto the list!

Trump’s Address to Congress: A Preview for Investors

A Presidential address to Congress is an important occasion. In the first year of a term, it is called just that. In later years, it will be called the State of the Union Address. The circumstances, ceremony, and protocol are the same. I have been watching these speeches for decades, first as a political science and public policy professor and more recently as an investment manager. The combination of these perspectives helps me identify the most important aspects of these events.

Background

The first such speech is especially important as a clue about the new relationship between the executive and legislative branches of government. I previewed Obama in 2009. In 2008 I suggested ideas for the Bush team, predicting that you would not hear that speech. I was (unfortunately) correct in that prediction. My suggestions would have helped to stabilize markets before the 2008 crisis.

The Trump Address

The simple term “address” is quite different from the standard approach of the President. His Inaugural Address is our only example. Most people, including most of the punditry, will be looking for the wrong things. The key points include both style and substance. In the conclusion, I will explain more about why the style is important. Here is your Trump Speech Checklist:

  • Initial entry. The Doorkeeper of the House will announce his arrival. A normal entry includes sustained and respectful cheering and a slow, hand-shaking pace up the aisle. It will be our first clue about mutual respect, and especially the President’s respect for Congressional traditions.
  • Trump’s target audience. In these speeches, there is always tension between playing to the room or to the TV audience. Trump’s style generally emphasizes the audience in front of him and is fueled by feedback from that audience. Most people do not understand how challenging it can be to remain focused on the larger television audience instead of what you see right in front of you.
  • Specific policy statements. Do not expect fresh news. He has already commented on most key issues, but without any real legislation. This is almost a polar opposite of the early days of Obama – early legislative success, but lingering doubt about what was to come next.
  • Signals of cooperation – in both directions. Will the President embrace the power and authority of Congress, seeking their cooperation? Will he realize that support from Democrats will be needed on some issues? And will the Congressional audience reciprocate and appreciate any such overtures?
  • Demonstration of political savvy. Recent statements suggest that the new administration has learned about the necessities of Congressional politics, and the implied order of policy actions. Any such signals will get a favorable reception on both sides of the aisle.
  • Channeling the Great Communicator. Since the Reagan era it has been typical for Presidents to salt the audience with special guests who will be recognized. Most importantly, this humanizes the need for policy proposals. Putting a face on problems is powerful symbolism. Rumor has it that Democrats will have their own guests, but that is not likely to matter.

Conclusion

The media will have various criteria for determining the success of this address. Polls will give us another take.

For investors, we can look for information on two key subjects:

  1. Compromise. The market does not want years of fighting over key policies. Think back to the election night reversal in stock futures after the President-elect made a conciliatory speech. Investors want certainty (meaning compromise) more than any specific policy.
  2. Timing. Most of the punditry has not done well in identifying “Trump stocks.” That is not surprising. This job requires a sector analysis of policies, needed cooperation, timing, and analysis of affected stocks. I created and described a Trump matrix, which continues to build with each new piece of information.

This preview is not as much fun as a beer-drinking bingo card of likely statements, but it will help you to focus on what is important.

If you really want to own the right market sectors and stocks, you need a firm grasp on the likely policy changes.

Weighing the Week Ahead: Have Stock Prices Lost Touch with Reality?

It is a big week for economic data and the first address to Congress from the new President. Most of the punditry is engaged in a collective head-shake about overbought conditions. Even if the data flow remains strong, pundits will be asking:

Have stock prices lost touch with reality?

 

Personal Notes

I always try to publish for Sunday morning, which is convenient for most readers. Occasionally circumstances delay me. Sorry about this weekend.

On a second front, a reader thought he spotted me at a political rally. Readers know that I emphasize political agnosticism in investing. Like most of you, I have opinions, but try to keep them separated from our decisions. With that in mind, I have an alibi for this occasion!

Last Week

Last week the economic news was mostly positive, and stocks responded.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA I predicted a discussion about Trump policies and the business cycle. This was partially correct, but the prevailing theme – by a widespread margin – emphasized the likely delays in key economic policies. That will be a transition point for the week ahead.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short via Jill Mislinski. She notes yet another record close based on the week’s gain of 0.7%.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post for several more charts providing long-term perspective.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was mostly positive.

The Good

 

The Bad

  • Hotel occupancy softened over the last few weeks (Calculated Risk).
  • New home sales missed expectations. The prior three months were all revised lower. While sales were up 5.5% year-over-year, the comparison months were among the weakest. Calculated Risk notes that these were the first months after mortgage rates moved higher and provides analysis and this key chart.

  • European tourism interest in America is down 12% after the travel ban. (Forbes).

The Ugly

Russia may have interfered with the Brexit vote say UK officials. Jake Kanter and Adam Bienkov have the story at Business Insider.

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. This week’s award goes to EconompicData, for an important and careful analysis of the effect of rising interest rates on bond investors.

The problem is that the debate over the Fed and interest rates became political. To maintain consistency, many argue that higher rates will be good for bond investors. Here is Jake’s summary of the problem:

I’ve read too many posts / articles that outline why a rise in rates is good for long-term bond investors (as that would allow reinvestment at higher rates). While this can be true depending on the duration of bonds owned and/or for nominal returns over an extended period of time, it is certainly not true over shorter periods of time and absolutely not true for an investor in most real return scenarios… even over very long periods of time.

There are a range of possible assumptions and consideration of each. Here is a key illustrative chart:

To summarize a great post – which bond investors should read carefully – higher rates will be great for future bond investors, but painful for those with current holdings.

 
The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have very big week for economic data, with all of the big reports except the employment situation.

The “A” List

  • ISM index (W). Important for both concurrent and leading qualities. Strength continuing?
  • Auto sales (W). More gains from a key sector or “peak auto?”
  • Consumer confidence (T). Will the great strength continue?
  • Personal income and spending (W). January data, but a very important business cycle series.
  • Fed beige book (W). With the Fed resuming a role as a key worry, there will be extra attention.
  • Initial jobless claims (Th). How long can the amazing strength continue?

The “B” List

  • ISM services index (F). Continuing strength? More important than manufacturing, but harder to interpret.
  • GDP Q4 (T). The second estimate includes more data, but little change is expected.
  • Durable goods (M). January data in a volatile series, but progress is needed.
  • Pending home sales (M). Not as important as new construction, but a good read on the market.
  • Chicago PMI (T). Best of the regional surveys is a little preview of the national ISM report the next day.
  • Construction spending (W). Big rebound expected in the important but volatile series.
  • Crude inventories (Th). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

President Trump’s first Address to Congress on Tuesday night will command attention in many ways. Most importantly for our purposes will be hints about legislative priorities and the Congressional reaction. Insider tip: Watch for things that get applause from both sides of the aisle.

Next Week’s Theme

 

The punditry, locked into a mindset about valuations, Trump policies, Fed significance, and daily preoccupation with what could go wrong is engaged in a collective head shake. Isn’t it obvious that many of the Trump policies will be delayed? Won’t this derail the “Trump Rally?”

The commentary increasingly expresses amazement, wondering:

Have Stock Prices Disconnected from Reality?

On one side, those who date the rally from the day of the election infer cause and effect. Anything that damages the prospects for tax and regulatory relief also damages the bullish story.

Another group notes that the market, after an extended period of strength is “overbought.”

An increasing number of observers is questioning whether Trump policies are actually the basis for the increase in stock prices.

If these policies are crucial, Tuesday night’s Presidential Address to Congress is definitely the key moment of the week – regardless of economic data.

What does this mean for investors? As usual, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in today’s “Final Thought”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

 

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment. (see below).

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Doug Short: The World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator and much more.Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. His interpretation suggests the probability creeping higher, but still after nine months.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies. His most recent post notes that the expected growth rate in S&P earnings is now 8.41% — the highest level since October, 2014.

The legal Marijuana business will create nearly 300,000 jobs by 2020.

 

How to Use WTWA (especially important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have eight different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

Most of my readers are not clients. While I write as if I were speaking personally to one of them, my objective is to help everyone. I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com for our current report package. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. All our models are now fully invested. The group meets weekly for a discussion they call the “Stock Exchange.” In each post I include a trading theme, ideas from each of our four technical experts, and some rebuttal from a fundamental analyst (usually me). We try to have fun, but there are always fresh ideas. Last week the focus was on sector rotation strategies, with a recent example from Oscar.

Top Trading Advice

 

Brett Steenbarger explains how knowledge is part of trading. He makes a powerful analogy between traders that can see both the macro and micro pictures and a quarterback who sees the entire field. His work always helps traders discover both what they should know, and how to learn it. While this was my favorite for the week, the daily posts should all be on the trader’s must-read list.

The early T-Wops (a negative Presidential tweet) had a negative impact on stocks. Traders learned this, of course, and the high-frequency algorithms did automated tracking. As often happens, once everyone catches on, things change. The WSJ shows that a Negative Tweet may not crush a stock

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be Warren Buffett’s annual letter to his investors. It is full of wit and humor – and plenty of great insights. You can learn about tax policy, accounting issues, stock buybacks, and Mr. Buffett’s ten-year bet where he took the overall market versus hedge funds.

Stock Ideas

 

Mr. Buffett’s dividend stocks versus the “dogs of the dow.” Jon C. Ogg crunches the numbers.

Big biotech? Battered down, but with good earnings and cash flow. Some of the companies also have a pipeline. Check out some large cap choices.

 

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, this is a must-read. Even the more casual long-term investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. As usual, investors will find value in several of them, but my favorite is the post from Dan Danford. He explains the difference between excellent but general advice from experts and advice specific to your circumstances. Keep this in mind when reading the Warren Buffett letter. Here is a key quote:

Those experts don’t know a thing about you or your situation. They don’t know your age, health, marital status or personality quirks. They don’t know where you live or how much your house cost. They don’t know how much you spend on groceries or hobbies, or that you were forced into early retirement by an ungrateful employer. They know none of this. Nada.

 

Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich’s strong series is ostensibly aimed at financial advisors – a must-read for them. It also attracts many DIY investors. The zesty topic of the week started with an explanation from a noted writer and advisor, David Merkel, on why investors need good advice. I strongly agree with David, but I realize that some investors enjoy doing the work to maintain a successful program. (Is that you? My (free) short paper on the top investor pitfalls is a good test of whether you can successfully fly solo. Send a request to main at newarc dot com).

 

Watch out for…

 

Rising interest rates. In a riff on this week’s Silver Bullet analysis, Davidson (via Todd Sullivan) explains some key fundamentals about rates, the yield curve and the Fed. It is another myth-busting analysis.

 

Final Thoughts

 

How the punditry interprets the current market depends on how one defines base valuations and expectancy.

  • Stock values are attractive
    • Emphasis on earnings expectations and forecasts
    • Belief in relative valuations – comparing stock expected performance, with bonds, real estate, gold, etc.
    • Confidence that a recession is not imminent.
  • Stocks are over-valued
    • Emphasis on trailing earnings
    • Analysis based partially on 19th century data
    • Belief that valuation is absolute. A sector’s value is independent of the alternatives
    • Focus on headline risk – uncertainty, world events, etc.

The result?

Most people choose the over-valued path. It is the conventional wisdom in the media. Even the bullish pundits choke out a statement that stocks are “reasonably valued.” This world view requires some explanation of why the stock rally continues. The explanation has changed over time —

  • Stocks are overvalued and a crash is likely.
  • A crash might not happen, but returns over the next five, ten, twelve years will be lower.
  • Valuation is not a good method of market timing, and who knows when the “half-cycle” will end?
  • Stock strength is due to extraordinary Fed policy, providing liquidity that banks or the plunge protection team use to buy stocks. It will end with the end of QE, which probably will never happen.
  • The end of QE merely shifted focus to Europe, where the ECB has taken over the money printing.
  • The current rally is based upon Trump promises, which will never come to pass and might not even work.

Investment Conclusion

I hope most will notice that the forward valuation approach and the recession data I report weekly is a simple explanation. The current market is what we would expect. The Republican victory had increased small business confidence, but is not the main driver of stock prices.

The prevailing explanation was wrong-footed at the start and has remained so. Like bad science, it has not explained anything, so it must be continually re-invented.

It is really not complicated. There will be a time to become cautious. Meanwhile, mid to late- stage cyclical stocks, financials, homebuilders, and technology remain attractive.

Stock Exchange: How to Play Sector Rotation

Sector rotation is a regular media topic, but few really understand it. Stock moves are often described in sector terms – retail, transports, industrials, biotech, etc. You get the drift.

There has been a movement to define sectors in terms of ETFs, but the slicing and dicing was not very accurate. Trades often included companies that were not directly related to changing news or the economy. While this was not important for the ETF traders, it presented an opportunity for those who defined sectors differently from the standard ETFs – the real Sector Experts.

Oscar is our sector trader, so he is featured this week. We’ll discuss his method. We also have some interesting stock ideas from the rest of the gang.

Review

Our last Stock Exchange featured a helpful discussion on how to buy the dips. The comments were great as well. There is special value when readers engage with our crew of “technical analysts.”

Today’s Theme

Sector rotation is a common trading and investment theme, but there is little agreement on what it really means. The introductory discussion (Investopedia) is helpful, but merely a starting point. For those who understand this process, this can be a very profitable trading method. As usual, I will conclude with a brief observation about the key points.

This Week—Playing Sector Rotation

Oscar

I’m back on REIT Real Estate (VNQ) this week. You might remember I picked this one back on December 15 (during a convenient little dip). It was fine for a short term holding, but I dropped in in early January once I’d made a modest profit.

My main problem with this sector is the volatility. The 200-day moving average is basically flat, but the prices have varied wildly. While VNQ was moving sideways, I was working other sectors with more of an upswing.

Still, I try to see the big picture. This sector is way off its all-time highs, and the stock has been appreciating in value all month. I’m okay with buying in again here – so long as I keep a close eye on it.

J: Why did you make the change in January?

O: I noticed that defenses were shifting against the rotation?

J: What?

O: You know. The Williams shift.

J: You are talking baseball?

O: Yes! Pitchers and catchers have reported – those happy words.

J: Many more teams have employed the shift. Even Joe Maddon, on occasion. The data-driven guys have nudged the game in a different direction.

O: Glad to see that you have noticed this trend.

J: I watched a White Sox game with my friend Ralph, (a brilliant trader, and the best baseball mind outside of baseball). We were in his seats behind home plate, watching Jim Thome at the plate. Left field was wide open. There was great opportunity because of the enemy expectations.

O: Are we talking baseball or stocks?

J: Both. How do you approach sector rotations?

O: First, I define sectors carefully. I do not accept some “textbook” definition. Next, I pick the right time frame. No reason to compete with those HFT guys, who change sectors because of a few words in a speech. Finally, I know when to exit.

J: And when is that?

O: When a different sector offers a better choice.

J: Do you want to elaborate on the VNQ decisions?

O: I monitor about 40 sectors and hold positions in the top three. When I sold the group in January, I bought some health insurance companies. When I bought back in, I sold China.

J: These were all sectors in the news – repealing Obamacare, trade agreement changes.

O: I don’t know about any of that. The chart tells all.

J: What about your current ratings and reader requests?

O: Here is the updated list. It does not show VNQ since no readers asked about it — but they should have!

 

 

Holmes

I like AutoNation (AN). Will higher lows lead to higher highs? In my training, this was a very positive signal. I do love to find stock that has dropped sharply without making a new low. The price action signals solid risk/reward plays for the short-term horizon. I don’t know why AutoNation fell from 52.50 to 47.68…but I see that is substantially higher than the previous low price on Nov 8 (40.26). I see a 3-4 dollar move in this name with a sell stop around 45.

J: In a pleasant change from your normal style, those emphasizing fundamentals agree with you. Look at the chart from Chuck Carnevale’s excellent F.A.S.T. Graphs site.

H: Dip-buying does not really reflect fundamentals.

J: Perhaps not directly, but it is easier to buy a dip when the value is there. Are you worried about the increase in sub-prime auto buyers?

H: I just explained why fundamentals are irrelevant for this trade.

J: The U.S. car market marks up the cars, and then gives rebates that you can count as part of the down payment. Over 30% of pickup truck buyers could not qualify for a credit card, but the payments get made.

O: As long as it keeps working for a few weeks. I will once again ring the cash register and move on!

 

 

Athena

I see short term potential here in Micron Technology (MU). Felix liked this one back in November of 2016 – in retrospect, a very wise move. At the same time, my goals are much different than his. Whereas Felix locked in a low price for long position, I’m comfortable buying up near the top and selling after a quick move.

This stock has been on the up-and-up since last May, with relatively few bumps in the road. The one exception, of course, is the downward slide MU has taken this month. That creates the opportunity for me to buy a small position, and look for it to appreciate within the next couple weeks.

J: This is one of the strangest fundamental charts I have seen. There is a valley of skepticism in this sector, with a sharp rebound expected.

A: That is the message of the market.

J: It is interesting to see that you and Felix agree. Readers often wonder what might bring you together.

A: Good question. I have wisdom while that fussbudget is eternally focused on twenty years ahead and whether his spice rack is organized.

 

 

 

 

 

Felix

I will once again begin with my responses to reader votes for the favorites list.

My list provides rankings within each zone, as well as the basics about buy, hold, and sell. The list includes the most recent reader questions as well as former requests where my rating has moved.

J: AMD is still on top?

F: It leads the reader list, but not my own.

J: I have had some questions about that. Readers want to know your own top picks.

F: If I talked about that here, I would be revealing what I recommend for your clients.

J: That is a problem. I want to be helpful to readers, but it should be a start for their own research. Do you have any fresh ideas of your own?

F: It’s nice of Athena to mention my mid-November Micron buy. I just wish I’d made the same move with Pandora (P). The absolute cratering of this holding in October of 2016 was a huge overcorrection. I wish I’d noticed it.

Despite that, I think now is an appropriate time for a long-term position here. The stock price has already grown from below $8.50 in early 2016. I’m optimistic that 2017 will bode similarly well. Count me in for at least 6 months on this one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J: I am a regular Pandora listener. I hope they succeed in a highly competitive field – and that we make a profit on this investment!

Conclusion

Sector rotation is often cited, but seldom understood. There are several things you must get right.

  1. An accurate definition of each sector.
  2. An effective time frame – recognition, exploitation, exit.
  3. A proven testing process.

Sector trading reduces single stock risk, while presenting most of the gains. You are rewarded for getting the main trend right.

The Stock Exchange features the best technical ideas. We also provide contrasting opinions from fundamental investors. Each approach can be profitable, and both provide good lessons.

We welcome comments, suggestions, and followers for each character. Even Jeff. I try to have fun once a week in writing this, and I hope you get a chuckle or two from reading it. Here is how to join in.

Background on the Stock Exchange

Each week Felix and Oscar host a poker game for some of their friends. Since they are all traders they love to discuss their best current ideas before the game starts. They like to call this their “Stock Exchange.” (Check it out for more background). Their methods are excellent, as you know if you have been following the series. Since the time frames and risk profiles differ, so do the stock ideas. You get to be a fly on the wall from my report. I am the only human present, and the only one using any fundamental analysis.

The result? Several expert ideas each week from traders, and a brief comment on the fundamentals from the human investor. The models are named to make it easy to remember their trading personalities.

Questions

If you want an opinion about a specific stock or sector, even those we did not mention, just ask! Put questions in the comments. Address them to a specific expert if you wish. Each has a specialty. Who is your favorite? (You can choose me, although my feelings will not be hurt very much if you prefer one of the models).

Getting Updates

We have a new (free) service to subscribers to our Felix/Oscar update list. You can suggest three favorite stocks and sectors. We report regularly on the “favorite fifteen” in each category– stocks and sectors—as determined by readers. Sign up with email to “etf at newarc dot com”. Suggestions and comments are welcome. In the tables below, green is a “buy,” yellow a “hold,” and red a “sell.” Each category represents about 1/3 of the underlying universe. Please remember that these are responses to reader requests, not necessarily stocks and sectors that we own. Sign up now to vote your favorite stock or sector onto the list!

Weighing the Week Ahead: Will Trump Policies Extend the Business Cycle?

We have another holiday-shortened week with little fresh data. While there are some Fed speakers on tap, it is not enough to feed the avaricious punditry. There are two competing themes: the spike in inflation and the continuing assessment of Trump Administration policies. Once again, I expect the two to be joined in most commentaries. Pundits will be asking:

Will Trump policies extend the business cycle?

 

Last Week

Last week the economic news was mostly positive, and stocks responded.

Theme Recap

In my last WTWA I predicted a conjunction of two themes as Fed Chair Yellen testified to Congress and President Trump considered candidates for several Fed vacancies. I was only half right. Yellen got plenty of attention from Congressional questioners and revealed that she plans to finish her term as Chair. She also gave some non-specific agreement with some of Trump’s principles about regulation. GOP questioners wanted to talk about the Fed balance sheet. President Trump did not comment about this. This topic will have continuing interest. Presidents are rarely fans of rising interest rates.

The Story in One Chart

I always start my personal review of the week by looking at this great chart from Doug Short via Jill Mislinski. She notes the record high and the overall gain of 1.51% for the week.

Doug has a special knack for pulling together all the relevant information. His charts save more than a thousand words! Read his entire post for several more charts providing long-term perspective.

The News

Each week I break down events into good and bad. Often there is an “ugly” and on rare occasion something very positive. My working definition of “good” has two components. The news must be market friendly and better than expectations. I avoid using my personal preferences in evaluating news – and you should, too!

This week’s news was mostly positive.

The Good

  • Retail sales increased 0.4% beating expectations of a flat report. December’s data was revised to a 1% gain from the prior 0.6%.
  • NFIB small business optimism shows that “economic growth is coming.” Dr. Ed opines that this must be a Trump effect.

  • Philly Fed survey rose 43.3, crushing expectations of 17.5 and the prior month’s 23.6. The six-month outlook also remains very strong. From the report:

  • Leading indicators remained strong increasing 0.6% and slightly beating expectations.

 

The Bad

  • Industrial production dropped 0.3%, missing expectations for a flat report.
  • Fewer developed market stocks are outperforming – 44% versus the 57% average. Eric Bush of GaveKal explains that this has a negative correlation with the overall market.
  • Kim Jong-un took two provocative actions, two days apart. Jonathan D. Pollack at Brookings wrote “…North Korea’s impetuous young leader, yet again reminded the outside world of his determination to defy international norms by all available means”. The ballistic missile test was a flagrant violation of agreements, and the assassination of his half-brother continues a policy of killing potential rivals. So far, the market has taken little notice of such events or other possible challenges to the new president.
  • Inflation data showed price increases greater than expected (Briefing.com consensus in parentheses). PPI was up 0.6% (0.3%). CPI up 0.6% (0.3%). Core CPI up 0.3% (0.2%).
  • Housing starts declined in January, so I am scoring this as a negative. The prior months were revised higher, and the result was a slight beat of expectations.Calculated Risk, one of the top sources on housing matters, ascribes the shifts to the volatile, multi-family sector. Bill expects starts to increase 3% – 7% in 2017. The range may seem wide, but he is careful to explain the expected error around his forecasts, which have been quite good. See the full post for charts splitting out multi- and single-family.

The Ugly

Malware is winning the race against antivirus software. Users are not taking the most important precautions. Hint: Strong passwords and a password manager. (Slate).

 

The Silver Bullet

I occasionally give the Silver Bullet award to someone who takes up an unpopular or thankless cause, doing the real work to demonstrate the facts. This week’s award goes to Josh Brown for his thoughtful analysis of debt, and what it really means. The arguments about excessive debt, the types of debt, and the threats to the system are easily made. It takes only a chart, and most readers are pre-convinced.

Explaining the data requires a deeper, second-order analysis. In his well-sourced aricle, Josh takes a comprehensive look at employment and lending. You need to read the entire post (twice) but the no-nonsense conclusion captures the key point for investors:

When bankers complain, the rhetoric is almost always a caricature of the reality. Today is no different. There’s probably room to streamline or clean up the crisis era regs, but to make the claim that “the banks can’t lend” flies in the face of the actual facts.

The Week Ahead

We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead. You can make your own predictions in the comments.

The Calendar

We have a very light week for economic data, with all reports in a three-day period.

The “A” List

  • New home sales (F). Gains expected in this important sector.
  • Michigan sentiment (F). Important indicator for employment and spending.
  • Initial jobless claims (Th). How long can the amazing strength continue?

The “B” List

  • Existing home sales (W). Not as important as new sales, but is a read on the overall strength of the housing market.
  • FOMC minutes (W). No surprises expected.
  • Crude inventories (Th). Recently showing even more impact on oil prices. Rightly or wrongly, that spills over to stocks.

     

Fed Presidents will be on the speaking trail. Earnings reports continue. Early actions from the Trump Administration have captured the spotlight and will continue to do so.

Next Week’s Theme

 

If the market did not have the extreme Trump focus, the question would be whether incipient inflation suggests the need for more aggressive Fed policy and the probably end of the growth portion of the business cycle.

With the daily parsing of tweets, executive orders, and (somewhat conflicting) policy statements, analysts are scrambling to define and re-define the “Trump Effect.”

In a holiday-shortened, light week for data, I expect a combination of these two themes:

Will Trump Policies Extend the Business Cycle?

Discussion of this topic includes both the policies and the business cycle. Most are not rigorous in separating them.

Scott Grannis does a good job by focusing on the inflation effect and the business cycle. He notes that core CPI inflation has been rather stable, and that it is “a stake through the heart of the deflation demon”.

By contrast, Barron’s focuses on the stock and market effects. In their cover story, they review each Administration move:

Will the week ahead provide any more clarity and focus? Maybe not, but investors should look for the following key points:

  1. Is there evidence of a business cycle peak? Here is Bob Dieli’s take, vividly comparing the disparate opinions:

  1. Will Trump policies extend the cycle? Some are citing confidence from both businesses and consumers as evidence of a return of “animal spirits.” The Trump administration is forecasting much stronger growth than does the CBO. (MarketWatch).
  2. Many Trump moves are generating opposition, sometimes with the Republican party.
  3. Most voters are looking for compromises. This is true of both parties. “The Hill.”

What does this mean for investors? As usual, I’ll have a few ideas of my own in today’s “Final Thought”.

Quant Corner

We follow some regular great sources and the best insights from each week.

Risk Analysis

Whether you are a trader or an investor, you need to understand risk. Think first about your risk. Only then should you consider possible rewards. I monitor many quantitative reports and highlight the best methods in this weekly update.

The Indicator Snapshot

 

The C-Score has again moved lower, reflecting more inflation via gasoline prices. The level is still not worrisome.

 

The Featured Sources:

 

Bob Dieli: The “C Score” which is a weekly estimate of his Enhanced Aggregate Spread (the most accurate real-time recession forecasting method over the last few decades). His subscribers get Monthly reports including both an economic overview of the economy and employment. (see below).

Holmes: Our cautious and clever watchdog, who sniffs out opportunity like a great detective, but emphasizes guarding assets.

Brian Gilmartin: Analysis of expected earnings for the overall market as well as coverage of many individual companies.

Doug Short: The World Markets Weekend Update (and much more).

RecessionAlert: Many strong quantitative indicators for both economic and market analysis. While we feature his recession analysis, Dwaine also has several interesting approaches to asset allocation. Try out his new public Twitter Feed.

Georg Vrba: The Business Cycle Indicator and much more.Check out his site for an array of interesting methods. Georg regularly analyzes Bob Dieli’s enhanced aggregate spread, considering when it might first give a recession signal. His interpretation suggests the probability creeping higher, but still after nine months.

The Brooklyn Investor looks at Warren Buffett’s returns, comparing them to other great investors and probability estimates.

Michael Hartnett’s (BofA Merrill Lynch) methods suggest a “melt-up” of 10%. I can’t argue. When CNBC interviewed me about my 2010 call for Dow 20K, I suggested that the next 8-10% would be pretty easy.

How to Use WTWA (especially important for new readers)

In this series, I share my preparation for the coming week. I write each post as if I were speaking directly to one of my clients. Most readers can just “listen in.” If you are unhappy with your current investment approach, we will be happy to talk with you. I start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush. Each client is different, so I have eight different programs ranging from very conservative bond ladders to very aggressive trading programs. A key question:

Are you preserving wealth, or like most of us, do you need to create more wealth?

Most of my readers are not clients. While I write as if I were speaking personally to one of them, my objective is to help everyone. I provide several free resources. Just write to info at newarc dot com for our current report package. We never share your email address with others, and send only what you seek. (Like you, we hate spam!)

 

Best Advice for the Week Ahead

The right move often depends on your time horizon. Are you a trader or an investor?

Insight for Traders

We consider both our models and the top sources we follow.

Felix and Holmes

We continue with a strongly bullish market forecast. All our models are now fully invested. The group meets weekly for a discussion they call the “Stock Exchange.” In each post I include a trading theme, ideas from each of our four technical experts, and some rebuttal from a fundamental analyst (usually me). We try to have fun, but there are always fresh ideas. Last week the focus was when and how to “buy the dips” with a current example from Holmes.

Top Trading Advice

 

Dr. Brett is back on the job, with several great posts this week. It is difficult to pick a favorite! He has advice on picking the right instruments to trade, identifying real trader education, and why you need to ask the right questions if you are to learn. Do you, for example track prices right after you are stopped out of a trade? There are several other tough, but valuable questions.

Consider attending his trading workshop at the upcoming NY Trading Expo.

Ralph Vince identifies three factors highly correlated with the price of private property. Traders often forget that guessing when to be short is against the odds.

Insight for Investors

Investors have a longer time horizon. The best moves frequently involve taking advantage of trading volatility!

Best of the Week

If I had to pick a single most important source for investors to read this week it would be Chuck Carnevale’s discussion of MLPs. This is a popular investment for those seeking income. Many just look at the yield. Chuck demonstrates the complexity of these partnerships, explaining valuation, tax considerations, and whether you are simply getting your money back. You should not invest in an MLP without reading this first. In addition to his general warning, he provides several ideas worthy of consideration.

 

Stock Ideas

 

Airline stocks. Warren Buffett? Really? His famous jocular quote was that a capitalist at Kitty Hawk should have shot Orville Wright to save money for his kids. Philip Van Doorn (MarketWatch) presents the story of this changed attitude. Josh Brown explainswhy Mr. B can be flexible while adhering to long-time principles.

Rural broadband? This could be a big beneficiary from an infrastructure plan (Brookings). Also, see my final investing thoughts below.

Our trading model, Holmes, has joined our other models in a weekly market discussion. Each one has a different “personality” and I get to be the human doing fundamental analysis. This week the dip-buying Holmes sold Nielsen (NLSN) on some strength and add General Electric (GE).

 

Seeking yield?

Blue Harbinger notes that Verizon’s yield has moved higher despite a reasonable payout ratio. I agree, but I prefer to write calls against stocks like this. If you stick to short-term calls (with the most rapid time decay) you can generate a cash flow of 9 or 10%, including both dividends and premiums from call sales. If the stock is called away, you find a new candidate, since you have gained 4-5% in six weeks. If the stock declines, you sell a new round of calls. If you merely break even, in the long term, on stocks, you are meeting your income objective. I do not typically mention trades before we do them, but we are looking at a buy/write against the April 50 call, which closed at 77 cents bid. You will collect a 58-cent dividend in early April. If the stock does not move, that is over 2 ½ percent in a few weeks. If it is called away, you make about 4.5% and can look for a new trade. This is a great idea for DIY investors who understand options. Naturally, this is an illustration, not a general recommendation. Do not consider it without consulting your financial advisor (yada yada)!

 

 

Personal Finance

Professional investors and traders have been making Abnormal Returns a daily stop for over ten years. If you are a serious investor managing your own account, this is a must-read. Even the more casual long-term investor should make time for a weekly trip on Wednesday. Tadas always has first-rate links for investors in his weekly special edition. The piece about the importance of a will is great. I liked the one helping you teach kids about money. (I tried to do this with poker chips, and you can guess the ending). My favorite was gender control over family finances. Do you think it matters who is earning more? (Hint: Mrs. OldProf regards it as completely irrelevant).

Seeking Alpha Editor Gil Weinreich’s strong series is ostensibly aimed at financial advisors – a must-read for them. It also attracts many DIY investors. The topics are always interesting, and the discussion is often spirited. Active versus passive investing is naturally a current hot topic.

Ben Carlson explains how to consider housing expenses as part of your overall financial plan.

In case you missed it, you might enjoy my brief, mid-week post on The Fastest Way to Improve Your Investment Results.

Watch out for…

Overpriced dividend stocks. SD Davis explains the need for looking beyond the hoped-for payments.

Yield plays with “dividends” that are merely a return of your own capital.

Emerging market bonds. Lisa Abramowicz at Bloomberg explains the risks, including a decline in foreign currency reserves.

 

And more on value investing

Black Rock’s Russ Koesterich demonstrates why this style can work in what is perceived as a tough market. Here is his illustrative chart:

Final Thoughts

 

After years of warnings about deflation and impending recessions, the economy is showing some real signs of strength. For whatever reason, much of the punditry clings to the “end of the up-cycle” thesis, in both the economy and in stocks. Neither economic cycles nor bull markets die of old age.

Inflation concerns are premature. The Fed prefers the core PCE measure, which has less emphasis on housing. It runs “cooler” than the CPI. The Fed has also indicated willingness to exceed the 2% inflation target for some time. They can fight inflation more readily than deflation. I do not expect Trump appointments to reverse this consensus.

Most importantly, the punditry calls it a Trump rally since it occurred at about the same time as the election. There is no analysis of reduced uncertainty or improved fundamentals. The main impact seems to be the promise of reduced regulation.

To summarize, there is a significant improvement in confidence, which is great for the economy and corporate earnings. The reasons for more confidence include many sources.

Investing Conclusion

Finding good ideas from major policy changes is an excellent approach — in theory.

In practice, there are many traps. Too often there are incentives for analysts to be first, rather than to be right. While I have suggested caution on this front several times, it is easier for me. I am not required to fill a TV time slot or write a report for brokerage firm clients. If there is no solid conclusion, I am not forced to act. My approach requires good information, including some which is not yet available. The matrix below is a partial representation of my results. There are more sectors, of course, and I have hundreds of tagged articles in a supporting database. I have preliminary entries for most of the cells. The table below is just an illustration of my approach.